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THE

OLI 0;

OR,

MUSEUM OF ENTERTAINMENT.

"A just image of human nature, representing its humours, and the changes
of fortune to which it is subject, for the delight and instruction of mankind."-DRYDEN.

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JOSEPH SHACKELL, 15, WINE OFFICE COURT, FLEET STREET.

SOLD BY LONGMAN AND CO.; WHITTAKER AND CO.; SHERWOOD AND CO.; SIM PRIN
AND MARSHALL; B. STBILL; w. STRANGE ; CARVILL, NEW YORK; LANCE, PARIS;

AND ALL BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

MDCCCXXXII,

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PREFACE.

In présenting to our Friends the Eighth Volume of the “ OLIO,” but little can be added to what has already been addressed on similar occasions.

When last we had the pleasure of saying a few words to our readers, it will be remembered that we promised to be unceasing in our endeavours to increase both the literary and graphic merits of the work, a promise which we flatter ourselves has been faithfully performed, totally regardless of labour or expense.

Without deviating from the path of truth, we may be allowed to say, that the literature of the present Volume is not inferior to its predecessors. In Original Articles, it will be found extremely rich, and it is hoped that, in all its varieties, no paucity of interest or information is any where observable.

To those authors whose genius and talent have lent a charm to the pages of the Olio, we take this opportunity of returning our grateful thanks for their valuable assistance; and, at the same time, express our regret that want

of room has compelled us to postpone many articles which we have been desirous of giving insertion :-early in the next Volume the corps-de-reserve shall be brought into active service.

One prominent and distinguishing feature of our work has been its illustrations, and to the improvement of that in the present Volume, we have devoted our best attention : in many instances, the size of the Engravings has been increased at considerable cost, and in no instance, we trust, have they been deteriorated in beauty or effect.

Nothing now remains for us to 'add, but that we shall consult every fresh, source of novelty and interest to improve our miscellany in all its departments, and render it more deserving of public favour.

December, 1831.

Olio

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#Ilustrated Article.

neither sex nor age being spared by the

merciless soldiers. THE VALE OF CORRIEWATER. But these enormities were not always For the Olio.

practised with impunity on the Cove

nanters ; driven to desperation, they Before commencing the following often burst from their hiding-places on tale, it has been judged necessary to their enemies, like the tiger springing prefix a few remarks in explanation of froin his lair, taking a bloody revenge those incidents which the reader might on their persecutors, whenever the opotherwise consider as both improbable portunity for so doing occurred. At and unnatural. In no reign, not even length the expulsion of the Stuarts from in that of the ruthless Mary, was reli- the throne, happily, put an end to the gious persecution carried to such a disturbed state of Scotland, the reli. height, as in those of Charles and gious persecutions ceasing entirely James II. The names of Claverhouse under the tolerant sway of the phlegand Dalzel are still spoken of to this matic Williain. day with dread and horror, by the pea The last rays of the set'ing sun were santry of Scotland and the northern ex- gilding the heathy sides of the romantic tremity of England. The officers and vale of Corrie water ; the river from soldiery were not slow in emulating the which the valley takes its name lay cruel example of their commanders; still and calm, without a ripple to disand the poor persecuted Covenanters, turb its glassy surface, reflecting in its or whigs, as they were termed in deri- clear waters the grand and picturesque sion, were hunted and shot down like scenery by which it is surrounded. The beasts of the forest ; to be suspected even leafy glades of the ancient Galwegian of following that persuasion, afforded a forest, which lines for some space the pretext for exercising the greatest cruel- banks of Corrie, scarcely stirred; even ties upon the unoffending peasants, the quivering branches of the aspen VOL. VIII. A

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