Studies of chess; containing Caissa, a poem, by sir W. Jones; A systematic introduction to the game; and The whole analysis of chess, by A.D. Philidor

Cover
1803
0 Rezensionen
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 204 - England, he whose king is stale-mated wins the game (l>); but in France and several other countries, the stale-mate is a drawn game. XVII. At all conclusions of parties, when a player seems not to know how to give the difficult mates, as that of a knight and a bishop against the king, that of a castle and a bishop against a castle...
Seite 200 - ... the piece forgotten to be set in its place. IV. If it is agreed to give the advantage of a piece, or a pawn, and it have been forgotten at the beginning of a game, it will be left to the choice of him who has suffered by such a mistake, to proceed, or to recommence. V. A piece once touched must be played, unless it be said, in touching...
Seite 205 - PIIILIDOIl being of opinion that an entire collection of the games he has played without looking over the chess,board would not be of any service to amateurs, he will only publish a few parties which he has played against three players at onc,e, subjoining the names of his respectable adversaries, in order to prove, and transmit to posterity, a fact, of which future ages might otherwise entertain aome doubt.
Seite 206 - DOR'S abilities, must appear one of the greatest of which the human memory is susceptible. He goes through it with astonishing accuracy, and often corrects mistakes in those who have the board before them. Mr.
Seite 202 - Every pawn which has reached the eighth or last square of the chess-board, is entitled to make a queen, or any other piece that shall be thought proper; and this, even when all the pieces remain on the chess-board.
Seite 206 - To those who understand Chess, this exertion of Mr. Philidor's abilities, must appear one of the greatest of which the human memory is susceptible. He goes through it with astonishing accuracy, and often corrects mistakes in those who have the board before them.
Seite 202 - XII. The king cannot castle when in check, nor after having been moved, nor if in passing he was exposed to a check, nor with a castle which has been removed from its place : and he that castles when he should not, must play his castle touched, or his king, at his own choice.
Seite 169 - The rook at the adverse queen's square. B. The rook at the adverse king's square. Notes. .. (d) This is the only move which can ensure victory : every other leads but to a drawn game. (e) Had he given check. you must have played your king to the adverse, king's second.
Seite 196 - As he does not [tush his pawn, nor give you leave to take the place opposite to his king, it must be a drawn game. Observations on the Ends of Parties. A single pawn cannot win, if the adverse king be placed in opposition to it A single pawn may win, if the king be before the pawn. Two pawns against one...
Seite 205 - Mr. PHILIDOR performed one of those wonderful exhibitions for which he is so much celebrated. He played at the same time three different games, without seeing either of the tables. His opponents were Count BRUHL, Mr. BOWDLER, and Mr.

Bibliografische Informationen