A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, FROM THE FIRST INVASION BY THE ROMANE TO THE ACCESSION OF WILLIAM AND MARY IN 1688

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Seite 275 - I must, in discharge of my conscience, use those other means which God hath put into my hands, to save that which the follies of other men may otherwise hazard to lose.
Seite 83 - The entertainment and show went forward, and most of the presenters went backward, or fell down; wine did so occupy their upper chambers.
Seite 83 - I rather think it was in his face. Much was the hurry and confusion; cloths and napkins were at hand to make all clean. His Majesty then got up and would dance with the Queen of Sheba, but he fell down and humbled himself before her and was carried to an inner chamber and laid on a bed of state...
Seite 18 - To free myself from the cry of blood, I protest, upon my soul and before God and his angels, I never had conference with you in any treason; nor was ever moved by you to the things I heretofore accused you of; and, for...
Seite 328 - I pray God bless him to carry it so that the Church may have honour, and the State service and content by it. And now, if the Church will not hold up themselves, under God I can do no more.
Seite 278 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm ; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.
Seite 196 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Seite 24 - If you aim at a Scottish presbytery, it agreeth as well with monarchy as God and the Devil. Then Jack and Tom and Will and Dick shall meet, and at their pleasures censure me and my Council and all our proceedings.
Seite 30 - It was contended that the clergy had no power to create offences, which should subject the delinquent to the civil punishment consequent on the sentence of excommunication : and in the next session of parliament a bill passed the commons, declaring that no canon or constitution ecclesiastical, made within the last ten years, or to be made thereafter, should be of force to impeach or hurt any person in his life, liberty, lands or goods, unless it were first confirmed by an act of the legislature.
Seite 97 - Abstract of his majesty's revenue, p. 71. will be surprised to learn that there was one praying that, in cases of prosecution for capital offences, the prisoner might be allowed to bring forward witnesses in his own defence. James replied, that he could not in conscience grant such an indulgence. It would encourage and multiply perjury. Men were already accustomed to forswear themselves even in civil actions : what less could be expected, when the life of a friend was at stake...

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