Suggestions for the Amelioration of the Present Condition of Ireland

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J. Ridgway, 1847 - 70 Seiten
 

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Seite 60 - PARTY has no doubt its evils ; but all the evils of party put together would be scarcely a grain in the balance, when compared •with the dissolution of honourable friendships, the pursuit of selfish ends, the want of concert in council...
Seite 5 - Since the works were begun, no outrages have been committed in the mountains ; in the commencement we had much trouble with the labourers, who seemed to think they should have everything their own way, and refused to work by task or measurement, according to the system laid down by me, and demanded to be employed by the day ; but, by patience and perseverance, we at length overcame their prejudices, and, on finding that when they worked fairly, they always earned good wages, they gave up their opposition,...
Seite 56 - Connaught is, howevor, that which deserves most attentive notice in relation to its navigable lakes. Its soil is not inferior to that of the rest of Ireland ; some of the sweetest pastures, and most productive lands, are found within its limits. Its coasts abound with fish ; its mountains are rich in ores ; its people are willing to work, and travel hundreds of miles seeking for work, even at a rate which only allows them to sustain existence. Yet that province is the reproach of Ireland and the...
Seite 6 - ... single car at that time in the whole district ; they had sticks placed with cross-bars, and drawn upon the ends ; but very seldom even that, for back-load horses with baskets were then used. • Is this district at the present moment in the condition that you have described it ? — It exhibits a very extraordinary contrast to the condition I have described. The people are now well-clothed, they are extremely industrious and orderly, and I have seen them attending...
Seite 18 - ... and these, in such infinite shoales and multitudes of fishes, are offered to the takers, as may justly move admiration, not only to strangers, but to those that daily are employed amongst them.
Seite 7 - ... improvement ? — The means adopted were, generally, an attention to the character of the people, and a constant desire on the part of the managers of the estate to avail themselves of the disposition of those people to the improvement of the lands, and to the improvement of their habits and character...
Seite 56 - ... produce, it becomes difficult to credit the fact that ten or twelve years since the whole was a barren waste, the asylum of...
Seite 7 - ... of the lands; and to the improvement of their "habits and character generally. It was done " with very little sacrifice of rent or of money ; but " a constant and earnest attention to the object of "improving the estate by the industry of the "people; and whenever any...
Seite 38 - ... 6d. to 10s. per man per week. About 40 females would be employed twelve months in needlework (hemstitch or veining) ; each could do one handkerchief on each working day; wages, 8s. per dozen, or 8d. per day. The goods, when finished, would be worth £2 10s. per dozen.
Seite 54 - Phoebus replied, and touched my trembling ears; "Fame is no plant that grows on mortal soil, Nor in the glistering foil Set off to the world, nor in broad rumour lies, But lives and spreads aloft by those pure eyes, And perfect witness of all-judging Jove; As he pronounces lastly on each deed, Of so much fame in Heaven expect thy meed.

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