American Indian Quotations

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Howard Langer
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996 - 260 Seiten


The first book of American Indian quotations, this volume offers 800 quotations covering more than four centuries of American life. The quotations include the words of warriors, poets, politicians, doctors, lawyers, athletes, and others. Arranged chronologically, they enable one to follow the history of American Indians since Columbus through the words of those who lived through centuries of despoilment, disease, and death. Putting real people into the tragedy that has been the story of Indian life, the book includes quotes not only about historic incidents, but also of Indian views on education, values, ecology, family, and religion. There is humor as well as quotations of defiance, war, and bloodshed. The language is rich and colorful, always moving.

The book provides brief biographical information on those quoted, including both contemporary and historical figures. The material is cross-referenced with subject, key word, author, and tribal indexes. The work is a reference book, a history book, and a resource for speakers and educators.

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Inhalt

American Indian Quotations
1
Anonymous Quotations Prayers and Proverbs
199
Author Index
221
Subject and Key Word Index
225
Tribe Index
259
Urheberrecht

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Seite 8 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it; I have killed many; I have fully glutted my vengeance: for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Seite 13 - Englishman, although you have conquered the French, you have not yet conquered us! We are not your slaves. These lakes, these woods and mountains, were left to us by our ancestors. They are our inheritance, and we will part with them to none.
Seite 107 - Only to the white man was nature a "wilderness" and only to him was the land "infested" with "wild" animals and "savage" people. To us it was tame. Earth was bountiful and we were surrounded with the blessings of the Great Mystery. Not until the hairy man from the east came and with brutal frenzy heaped injustices upon us and the families we loved was it "wild
Seite 100 - You have noticed that everything an Indian does is in a circle, and that is because the Power of the World always works in circles, and everything tries to be round. In the old days when we were a strong and happy people, all our power came to us from the sacred hoop of the nation, and so long as the hoop was unbroken, the people flourished.
Seite 119 - ... a State which dwarfs its men, in order that they may be more docile instruments in its hands even for beneficial purposes— will find that with small men no great thing can really be accomplished...
Seite 12 - But an evil day came upon us. Your forefathers crossed the great waters, and landed on this island. Their numbers were small. They found friends and not enemies. They told us they had fled from their own country for fear of wicked men, and had come here to enjoy their religion. They asked for a small seat. We took pity on them, granted their request, and they sat down amongst us. We gave them corn and meat.
Seite 75 - It is the young men who say yes or no. He who led the young men is dead. It is cold and we have no blankets. The little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food; no one knows where they are — perhaps freezing to death.
Seite xiii - You will do well to try to inoculate the Indians by means of blankets, as well as to try every other method that can serve to extirpate this execrable race.
Seite 25 - And when the last Red Man shall have perished, and the memory of my tribe shall have become a myth among the White Men, these shores will swarm with the invisible dead of my tribe...
Seite 75 - He who led on the young men is dead. It is cold and we have no blankets. The little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food; no one knows where they are — perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me, my chiefs. I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever.

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Über den Autor (1996)

HOWARD J. LANGER is an independent researcher and freelance writer./e He has produced a range of materials on American and world history in many different formats, written numerous magazine articles, and authored three books.

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