Shakespeare's Roman Plays and Their Background

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Macmillan, 1925 - 666 Seiten
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Seite 201 - How that might change his nature, there's the question. It is the bright day that brings forth the adder ; And that craves wary walking. Crown him ? — that ;— And then, I grant, we put a sting in him, That at his will he may do danger with.
Seite 264 - By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash By any indirection...
Seite 173 - In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A little ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets : As stars with trains of fire and dews of blood, Disasters in the sun, and the moist star, Upon whose influence Neptune's empire stands, Was sick almost to doomsday with eclipse...
Seite 262 - Remember March, the ides of March remember : Did not great Julius bleed for justice sake ? What villain touch'd his body, that did stab, And not for justice ? What ! shall one of us, That struck the foremost man of all this world But for supporting robbers, shall we now...
Seite 438 - Let Rome in Tiber melt, and the wide arch Of the rang'd empire fall ! Here is my space. Kingdoms are clay : our dungy earth alike Feeds beast as man : the nobleness of life Is to do thus ; when such a mutual pair [Embracing.
Seite 171 - That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him: For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech, To stir men's blood: I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me...
Seite 616 - O mother, mother! What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But, for your son — believe it, O, believe it — Most dangerously you have with him prevailed, If not most mortal to him.
Seite 425 - My desolation does begin to make A better life : Tis paltry to be Caesar; Not being fortune, he's but fortune's knave, A minister of her will ; And it is great To do that thing that ends all other deeds ; Which shackles accidents, and bolts up change; Which sleeps, and never palates more the dung, The beggar's nurse and Caesar's.
Seite 201 - tis a common proof That lowliness is young ambition's ladder, Whereto the climber-upward turns his face; But when he once attains the upmost round, He then unto the ladder turns his back, Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees By which he did ascend.
Seite 221 - Would he were fatter! but I fear him not: Yet if my name were liable to fear, I do not know the man I should avoid So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men; he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself, and scorn'd his spirit That could be mov'd to smile at any thing.

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