Conflict and Identity in Romans: The Social Setting of Paul's Letter

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Fortress Press, 07.11.2003 - 458 Seiten
What is the purpose of Paul's letter to the Romans? Esler provides an illuminating analysis of this epistle, employing social-scientific methods along with epigraphy and archaeology. His conclusion is that the apostle Paul was attempting to facilitate the resolution of intergroup conflict among the Christ-followers of Rome, especially between Judeans and non-Judeans, and to establish a new identity for them by developing a form of group categorization that subsumes the various groups into a new entity.
 

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Inhalt

Romans and Christian Identity
xi
Explaining Social Identity
17
Ethnicity Ethnic Conflict and the Ancient Mediterranean World
38
The Context Rome in the 50s ce
75
The Letters Purpose in the Light of Romans 1115 and 15141627
107
Common Ingroup Identity and Romans 11320
133
The Foundations of the New Identity Romans 32131
153
Abraham as a Prototype of Group Identity Romans 4
169
The Exalted Character of the New Identity Romans 8
241
Israel and the ChristMovement Romans 911
266
Descriptors of the New Identity Romans 1213
306
The Weak and the Strong Romans 1411513
337
Conflict and Identity
355
Notes
364
Bibliography
414
Index
445

The New Identity in Christ Origin and Entry Romans 56
193
Pauline Leadership and Group Exemplification in Romans 7
220

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Über den Autor (2003)

Philip F. Esler is Professor of Biblical Criticism at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. Among his publications are Conflict and Identity in Romans (Fortress Press, 2003), The Early Christian World (editor, 2000), Galatians (1998), and The Early Christians and Their Social Worlds (1994).

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