Introduction to the Literature of Europe: In the Fifteenth, Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, Band 1

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Metrical Romances Havelok the Dane
47
Poetry of France and Spain
53
Layamon
59
State of European Languages about 1400
65
Average State of Knowledge in England
72
Known to Peter of Clugni
75
Roman Laws never wholly unknown
81
Decline of Jurists after Accursius
87
Lanfranc and his Schools
93
Improvement of Classical Taste in Twelfth Century
100
Some Improvement in Italy during Thirteenth Century
106
Accompanied with Faults 425
111
John of Ravenna
112
Zeal for Classical Literature in Italy
114
Early Greek Scholars of Europe
120
Little Appearance of it in the Fourteenth Century
126
Few acquainted with the Language in their Time
132
Public Encouragement delayed
138
Classical Learning in France low
144
Arabian Numerals and Method
151
Astronomy
157
Consonant and assonant Rhymes
165
Lydgate
171
Its probable Origin
177
Popular Moral Fictions
184
Three Lines of religious Opinion in Fifteenth
187
Nature of his Arguments
193
Laurentius Valla
199
Marsilius Ficinus
206
Early printed Sheets
212
Purbach his mathematical Discoveries
215
Lorenzo de Medici
221
Paston Letters
228
Works on that Subject
234
Historical Works 652
235
Library of Lorenzo
241
Philosophical Dialogues
247
Controversy of Realists and Nominalists
253
Arts of Delineation
260
His Version of Herodian
266
Platonic Theology of Ficinus
273
Confidence in Traditions 278
279
State of Learning in Germany
286
Latin
291
First French Theatre
297
Lionardo da Vinci
303
Hermolaus Barbarus
309
Francesco Bello
315
Dawn of Greek Learning in England
321
Portuguese Lyric Poetry
328

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