The Brief Remarker on the Ways of Man:

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Seite 84 - When thou art bidden of any man to a wedding, sit not down in the highest room...
Seite 95 - If any man offend not in word, the same is a perfect man, and able also to bridle the whole body.
Seite 298 - Wherefore did Nature pour her bounties forth With such a full and unwithdrawing hand, Covering the earth with odors, fruits, and flocks, Thronging the seas with spawn innumerable, But all to please and sate the curious taste?
Seite 298 - A part how small of the terraqueous globe Is tenanted by man? the rest a waste; Rocks, deserts, frozen seas, and burning sands! Wild haunts of monsters, poisons, stings, and death Such is earth's melancholy map! but, far 'More sad! this earth is a true map of man: So bounded are its haughty lord's delights To woe's wide empire, where deep troubles toss.
Seite 166 - And what is friendship but a name, A charm that lulls to sleep ; A shade that follows wealth or fame, And leaves the wretch to weep...
Seite 181 - I made me great works ; I builded me houses ; I planted me vineyards : I made me gardens and orchards, and I planted trees in them of all kind of fruits: I made me pools of water, to water therewith the wood that bringeth forth trees...
Seite 270 - Apart, she sigh'd; alone, she shed the tear; Then, as if breaking from a cloud, she gave Fresh light, and gilt the prospect of the grave. One day he lighter seem'd, and they forgot The care, the dread, the anguish of their lot; They spoke with cheerfulness, and seem'd to think, Yet said not so — 'Perhaps he will not sink'.
Seite 347 - THERE is a calm for those who weep, A rest for weary pilgrims found, They softly lie and sweetly sleep Low in the ground.
Seite 129 - House he spoke to me (which he had never done before), and with great civility; and he ever after manifested a readiness to serve me on all occasions, so that we became great friends and our friendship continued to his death. This is another instance of the truth of an old maxim I had learned, which says, ''He that has once done you a kindness will be more ready to do you another than he whom you yourself have obliged.
Seite 26 - same course which Rome itself had run before it: from virtuous industry to wealth ; from wealth to luxury; from luxury to an impatience of discipline, and corruption of morals : till, by a total degeneracy and loss of virtue, being grown ripe for destruction, it falls a prey at last to some hardy oppressor, and, with the loss of liberty, losing every thing that is valuable, sinks gradually again into its original barbarism.

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