Market Orientation in Food and Agriculture

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Springer Science & Business Media, 30.11.1995 - 284 Seiten
In the fall of 1990, the Danish government started a comprehensive research pro gramme to improve the competitiveness of the Danish food sector: The Research and Development Programme in the Danish Food Sector (Det F!Ildevareteknologiske Forsk nings- og Udviklingsprogram, F0TEK). The programme was based on a combination of basic research to be carried out by universities and other research institutions, and a series of collaboration projects between researchers and food companies. The programme was originally designed as a technological research programme. However, in the planning phases of the research programme, the view that the development of new technologies and products may not be sufficient to improve competitiveness made some ground. A small comer of the overall research effort was therefore set aside for market-oriented research. This comer was filled by the research programme Market-based process and product innovation in the food sector (MAPP). MAPP was a joint research programme in which researchers from several Danish universities and business schools participated; it was coordinated by the Aarhus School of Business. MAPP set out to achieve a difficult task: to conduct high quality research on various aspects of the marketing of food products, to do so in cooperation with food companies, and to win under standing and recognition from the colleagues in the food technology departments.
 

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Inhalt

PART I INTRODUCTION
1
COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
3
Strategic decisions and competitive advantage
6
Strategic decisions and market intelligence
9
MARKET ORIENTATION
11
What makes a company marketoriented?
12
How marketoriented is the food industry?
13
MARKETORIENTED PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
17
Retailers buying behaviour
151
Retailers participation in product development
152
INFORMATION ON RETAILERS DECISIONMAKING PROCESS AND VALUE PERCEPTION USED IN THE DISTRIBUTION MODULE
153
SELECTED STUDIES
154
Studies of retailers decisionmaking process selection criteria and involvement in manufacturers product development process
155
Quality certification as a listing criterion
158
Buying behaviour for beef
159
Buying behaviour for ecological dairy products
161

THE PLAN OF THIS BOOK
18
GENERATING MARKET INTELLIGENCE
19
DEFINING A MARKET INTELLIGENCE SYSTEM
20
APPEAL AND VALIDITY OF A MARKET INTELLIGENCE SYSTEM
21
MODULES FOR A MARKET INTELLIGENCE SYSTEM
22
Consumers
23
Distributors
26
GENERATING INTELLIGENCE ABOUT CONSUMER AND DISTRIBUTOR CHARACTERISTICS
27
ANALYSING CONSUMERS AT THE AGGREGATE LEVEL
29
FACTORS WHICH DETERMINE CONSUMERS VALUE PERCEPTION
31
THE IMPACT OF HOUSEHOLD RESOURCES ON FOOD CHOICE
32
AN EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF FOODRELATED PREFERENCES AND BEHAVIOUR IN EUROPEAN REGIONS
36
The clusters obtained
42
Characteristics of the British Germanspeaking and Frenchspeaking clusters
44
TOWARDS A CONCEPT OF FOODRELATED LIFESTYLE
46
MEASURING FOODRELATED LIFESTYLE
50
FOODRELATED LIFESTYLE IN GERMANY FRANCE AND GREAT BRITAIN
53
France
59
Great Britain
63
Food consumers in Germany France and Great Britain a comparison
69
UNDERSTANDING GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CONSUMER VALUE PERCEPTION
73
ANALYSING CONSUMERS AT THE INDIVIDUAL LEVEL
75
MODELS OF FOOD QUALITY
76
AN INTEGRATIVE MODEL OF FOOD QUALITY
81
TOOLS IN ANALYSING ASPECTS OF FOOD QUALITY
83
EXAMPLES
87
A TOOLBOX FOR ANALYSING FOOD QUALITY
108
ANALYSING DISTRIBUTORS AT THE AGGREGATE LEVEL
113
THEORETICAL BASIS
115
Theories on change in retail structure
117
FRAME OF REFERENCE FOR ANALYSING RETAIL STRUCTURE
119
VARIABLES FOR DESCRIBING RETAIL STRUCTURE
120
Types of stores
121
Types of store formatsstore concepts
123
Location
124
Technology
125
VARIABLES FOR DESCRIBING RETAIL GROUPS
126
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
127
STUDIES OF RETAIL STRUCTURES AND RETAIL GROUPS
128
Historical development actual retail structure and future trends in selected countries
135
IMPLICATIONS
141
ANALYSING DISTRIBUTORS AT THE ORGANISATIONAL LEVEL
143
THEORETICAL BASIS
145
Organisational buying behaviour
147
The product development process
149
FRAME OF REFERENCE
150
IMPLICATIONS
162
CASE THE GENERATION OF MARKET INTELLIGENCE IN A MEDIUMSIZED FOOD COMPANY
165
CONSUMER ANALYSES
166
Quantitative analyses
168
DISTRIBUTION ANALYSES
170
STRATEGIC POSSIBILITIES
172
DEVELOPMENT OF COMPETENCES
174
Market communication to consumers
175
PERSPECTIVES FOR GENERATING MARKET INTELLIGENCE
176
DEVELOPING MARKET RESPONSIVENESS AND PROFITABILITY
179
THEORETICAL BASIS
181
EMPIRICAL STUDIES OF MARKET ORIENTATION AND PROFITABILITY
182
OUTSIDEIN PROCESSES
185
INSIDEOUT PROCESSES
187
SPANNING PROCESSES
189
OVERVIEW OF PART III
193
SHORT AND MEDIUM TERM PRODUCT AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT
195
WHAT IS MARKETORIENTED PRODUCT AND PROCESS INNOVATION?
196
FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES
198
Market focus
199
Organisation of product development
200
NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE IN MEDIUMSIZED FOOD COMPANIES
201
Market focus
202
The organisation of product development
203
The gap between practice and normative recommendations
204
CHANGING NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE IN MEDIUM SIZED FOOD COMPANIES
206
HOW TO OVERCOME BARRIERS TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SUCCESS CRITERIA IN NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
208
LONGTERM DEVELOPMENT OF FIRM AND INDUSTRY
209
KEY SUCCESS FACTORS
210
PATH DEPENDENCIES IN TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT
212
PATH DEPENDENCIES IN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
214
INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE AND THE INTERNATIONALISATION PROCESSES OF FOOD COMPANIES
216
CROSSCULTURAL INTERACTIONS IN THE FOOD SECTOR
219
LONGTERM PROFITABILITY AND SURVIVAL IN INTERNATIONAL FOOD MARKETS
223
DEVELOPING SUPPLIER AND CUSTOMER RELATIONS
227
TYPES OF RELATIONSHIPS
228
STUDIES OF FOOD COMPANIES RELATIONS TO SUPPLIERS
232
STUDIES OF FOOD COMPANIES RELATIONS TO DIRECT CUSTOMERS
235
AN EXAMPLE OF MORE COMPLEX VERTICAL RELATIONS
237
HOW TO SELECT PARTNERS AND BUILD RELATIONS
240
CONCLUSION
243
MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS
247
RESEARCH PERSPECTIVES
250
REFERENCES
255
INDEX
269
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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 260 - Une methode d'estimation de la validit6 interculturelle des instruments de mesure: le cas de la mesure des valeurs des consommateurs par la liste des valeurs LOV.
Seite 267 - T., 1980. Distribution channels as political economics: a framework for comparative analysis.
Seite 267 - A Two-Factor Classification of Competitive Strategy Variables," Strategic Management Journal, 6 (October-December), 357-76. Wagner, Harvey M. (1984), "Profit Wonders; Investment Blunders," Harvard Business Review, 62 (September-October), 121-35.
Seite 260 - Food-related lifestyle: Development of a cross-culturally valid instrument for market surveillance.

Über den Autor (1995)

Janet Hardy-Gould has taught for different EFL organisations both in the UK and overseas including: International House, ST. Giles College, Regent Language Training and Bell. She is currently a freelance teacher trainer and ELT author. Janet writes regularly for The Guardian Weekly, SpeakingEnglish section, and her published works include a number of titles for the Oxford Bookworms and Dominoes series.

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