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Whirled and spun about in circles,
Fanned the air into a whirlwind,
Danced the dust and leaves about him,
And amid the whirling eddies
Sprang into a hollow oak tree,
Changed himself into a serpent,
Gliding out through root and rubbish.
With his right hand Hiawatha
Smote amain the hollow oak tree,
Rent it into shreds and splinters,
Left it lying there in fragments.
But in vain; for Pau-Puk-Keewis,
Once again in human figure,
Full in sight ran on before him,
Sped away in gust and whirlwind,
On the shores of Gitche Gumee,
Westward by the Big-Sea-Water,
Came unto the rocky headlands,
To the Pictured Rocks of sandstone,
Looking over lake and landscape.

And the Old Man of the Mountain,
He the Manito of Mountains,
Opened wide his rocky doorways,
Opened wide his deep abysses,
Giving Pau-Puk-Keewis shelter
In his caverns dark and dreary,
Bidding Pau-Puk-Keewis welcome

To his gloomy lodge of sandstone.

There without stood Hiawatha,
Found the doorways closed against him,
With his mittens, Minjekahwun,
Smote great caverns in the sandstone,
Cried aloud in tones of thunder,
"Open! I am Hiawatha!"
But the Old Man of the Mountain
Opened not, and made no answer
From the silent crags of sandstone,
From the gloomy rock abysses.

Then he raised his hands to heaven,
Called imploring on the tempest,
Called Waywassimo, the lightning,
And the thunder, Annemeekee;
And they came with night and darkness,
Sweeping down the Big-Sea-Water
From the distant Thunder Mountains;
And the trembling Pau-Puk-Keewis
Heard the footsteps of the thunder,
Saw the red eyes of the lightning,
Was afraid, and crouched and trembled.
Then Waywassimo, the lightning,
Smote the doorways of the caverns,
With his war-club smote the doorways,
Smote the jutting crags of sandstone,
And the thunder, Annemeekee,

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Shouted down into the caverns,
Saying, "Where is Pau-Puk-Keewis!"
And the crags fell, and beneath them
Dead among the rocky ruins
Lay the cunning Pau-Puk-Keewis,
Slain in his own human figure.

Ended were his wild adventures,
Ended were his tricks and gambols,
Ended all his craft and cunning,
Ended all his mischief-making,
All his gambling and his dancing,
All his wooing of the maidens.

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Then the noble Hiawatha
Took his soul, his ghost, his shadow,
Spake and said: "O Pau-Puk-Keewis,
Never more in human figure
Shall you search for new adventures;
Never more with jest and laughter
Dance the dust and leaves in whirlwinds;
But above there in the heavens

You shall soar and sail in circles;
I will change you to an eagle,
To Keneu, the great war eagle,
Chief of all the fowls with feathers,
Chief of Hiawatha's chickens."

And the name of Pau-Puk-Keewis
Lingers still among the people,

Lingers still among the singers,
And among the story-tellers;
And in winter, when the snowflakes
Whirl in eddies round the lodges,
When the wind in gusty tumult
O'er the smoke-flue pipes and whistles,

There," they cry,

He is dancing through the village,

He is gathering in his harvest!"
-HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW: The Song of Hiawatha.

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comes Pau-Puk-Keewis;

e'ther (in poetry), the upper air; re ced'ing, getting farther away; a byss'es, depths; gam'bols, dancings and skippings.

1. What kind of bird is a brant? What does the poem tell you about it? Find out whatever else you can about it. 2. Describe the transformations of Pau-Puk-Keewis. 3. How was he finally caught? Into what was he changed? 4. Make a list of all the birds mentioned in the last four lessons; all the animals. 5. Do the lines rhyme in this poem? In what ways does the author make his story more like a poem than like a piece of prose writing?

jest

paint

govern

Word Study: Suffixes. Notice the following words: hunt er, slay er, speak er, sing er, sail or. What syllable has been added in each case? How has that syllable changed the meaning of the word?

Syllables added at the end of a word are called suffixes.
Add the suffi er or or to each of the following words:

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ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE

I. THE WRECK AND THE ISLAND

WHEN I waked it was broad day, the weather clear, and the storm abated, so that the sea did not rage and swell as before. But that which surprised me most was that the ship was lifted off in the night from the sand 5 where she lay, by the swelling of the tide, and was driven up to within about a mile from the shore where I was. As it seemed still to stand upright, I wished myself on board that I might have some necessary things for my

use.

A little after noon I found the sea very calm, and the tide ebbed so far out that I could come within a quarter of a mile of the ship; so I pulled off my clothes, for the weather was extremely hot, and took to the water. But when I came to the ship my difficulty was to know how 15 to get on board; for as she lay aground, and high out of the water, there was nothing within my reach to lay hold of.

I swam round her twice, and the second time I spied a small piece of rope, which I wondered I did not see at 20 first, hanging down by the fore chains, and this with great difficulty I got hold of, and thus climbed up into the forecastle of the ship. Here I found that the ship was bulged,

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