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Speak to these curious hearts of ours,

And teach them to be still.

God hath his mysteries of grace,

Ways that we cannot tell;

He hides them deep, like the hidden sleep

Of Him He loved so well.

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"And Moses went up from the plains of Moab unto the mountain of Nebo, to the top of Pisgah, that is over against Jericho. . . So Moses the servant of the Lord died there in the land of Moab, according to the word of the Lord. And he buried him in a valley in the land of Moab, over against Beth-peor; but no man knoweth of his sepulchre unto this day." - Deuteronomy xxxiv. 1-6.

sep'ul cher, grave; train, procession; verd'ure, green foliage and grass; ey'rie, nest; hal'lowed, made holy; re versed', turned upside down; sage, wise man; min'ster, cathedral; tran'sept, when a church is built in the form of a cross, the shorter arm; em blaʼzoned, covered with painted figures; phi los'o pher, wise man; pall, the funeral covering of the dead; bier, that on which a dead body rests.

1. Who was Moses? 2. Where is the river Jordan? 3. In how many ways is the loneliness of the grave emphasized? Read the lines that picture it. 4. Substitute other words for sage, bard, minster, and then explain the sixth stanza. 5. What contrast is drawn between the funeral of a warrior and that of Moses? 6. Why is Moses called the "truest warrior that ever buckled sword"? 7. What are some of the great "truths" that he wrote down for men? 8. Commit to memory the stanza or stanzas that you like best.

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HIAWATHA AND PEARL-FEATHER

[As has been said before, all early people had their myths and hero legends. The American Indians, who, until recent times, lived much the same free, simple, out-of-door life that the Greek and German tribes lived many centuries ago, had theirs also. The myths of the Ojibways, who once occupied the country round the Great Lakes, were collected almost a century ago, and Longfellow turned them into verse in Hiawatha. The selections that follow relate the services of this hero to his tribe in slaying an evil magician, and in ridding his people of the troublesome Pau-Puk-Keewis.]

On the shores of Gitche Gumee,
Of the shining Big-Sea-Water,
Stood Nokomis, the old woman,
Pointing with her finger westward,
O'er the water pointing westward,
To the purple clouds of sunset.

Fiercely the red sun descending
Burned his way along the heavens,
Set the sky on fire behind him,
As war parties, when retreating,
Burn the prairies on their war trail;
And the moon, the Night-Sun, eastward,
Suddenly starting from his ambush,
Followed fast those bloody footprints,
Followed in that fiery war trail,
With its glare upon his features.

And Nokomis, the old woman,
Pointing with her finger westward,
Spake these words to Hiawatha:
"Yonder dwells the great Pearl-Feather,
Megissogwon, the Magician,
Manito of Wealth and Wampum,
Guarded by his fiery serpents,
Guarded by the black pitch water.
You can see his fiery serpents,
The Kenabeek, the great serpents,
Coiling, playing in the water;
You can see the black pitch water
Stretching far away beyond them,
To the purple clouds of sunset!

"He it was who slew my father,
By his wicked wiles and cunning,
When he from the moon descended,
When he came on earth to seek me.
He, the mightiest of Magicians,
Sends the fever from the marshes,
Sends the white fog from the fen lards,
Sends disease and death among us!
"Take your bow, O Hiawatha,
Take your arrows, jasper-headed,
Take your war club, Puggawaugun,
And your mittens, Minjekahwun,
And
your birch canoe for sailing,

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And the oil of Mishe-Nahma,
So to smear its sides, that swiftly
You may pass the black pitch water;
Slay this merciless magician,
Save the people from the fever
And avenge my father's murder!"

Straightway then my Hiawatha
Armed himself with all his war gear,
Launched his birch canoe for sailing;
With his palm its sides he patted,
Said with glee, "Cheemaun, my darling,
O
my Birch-Canoe! leap forward,
Where you see the fiery serpents,
Where you see the black pitch water!"
Forward leaped Cheemaun exulting,
And the noble Hiawatha

Sang his war song wild and woful,
And above him the war eagle,
The Keneu, the great war eagle,
Master of all fowls with feathers,
Screamed and hurtled through the heavens.
Soon he reached the fiery serpents,
The Kenabeek, the great serpents,
Lying huge upon the water,
Sparkling, rippling in the water,
Lying coiled across the passage,
With their blazing crests uplifted,

Breathing fiery fogs and vapors,
So that none could pass beyond them.
But the fearless Hiawatha

Cried aloud, and spake in this wise:
"Let me pass my way, Kenabeek,
Let me go upon my journey!"
And they answered, hissing fiercely,
With their fiery breath made answer:
"Back, go back! O Shaugodaya!
Back to old Nokomis, Faint-heart!"
Then the angry Hiawatha
Raised his mighty bow of ash tree,
Seized his arrows, jasper-headed,
Shot them fast among the serpents;
Every twanging of the bowstring
Was a war cry and a death cry,
Every whizzing of an arrow
Was a death song of Kenabeek.

Weltering in the bloody water,
Dead lay all the fiery serpents,
And among them Hiawatha
Harmless sailed, and cried exulting:
"Onward, O Cheemaun, my darling!
Onward to the black pitch water!"

Then he took the oil of Nahma,
And the bows and sides anointed,
Smeared them well with oil, that swiftly

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