An essay on the teeth and dental practice

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Seite 31 - The length of a male has been known to be seventeen feet, the height seven feet, and the circumference fifteen ; the head three feet and a half, and the girt nine feet ; the mouth in width about two feet. The general color of the animal is brownish ; the ears small and pointed...
Seite 48 - ... in the argument, it is wholly on that side of the question which I have just taken. Those animals, whose teeth and digestive apparatus most nearly resemble our own, namely, the apes and monkeys, are undoubtedly frugivorous ; but as from their organization, they are necessarily tropical animals, and without the gift of reason, by which they might have overcome the difference of temperature by artificial means, they remain still restricted to their original food, and confined to the very limited...
Seite 47 - I think, going too far to say, that every fact connected with the human organization goes to prove, that man was originally formed a frugivorous animal, and therefore, probably, tropical or nearly so, with regard to his geographical situation. This opinion is principally derived from the formation of his teeth and digestive organs, as well as from the character of his skin, and the general structure of his limbs.
Seite 46 - ... a particular class of teeth, a corresponding development of that class is found to take place, to a much greater degree than in man. Thus, in the carnivora, the cuspidati are greatly elongated and strengthened, in order to enable them to seize their food, and to tear it in pieces; in the rodentia, or gnawing animals, as in the beaver for instance, the incisors are remarkably long, and exhibit that extraordinary development which their peculiar habits demand; and, in the graminivorous animals,...
Seite 46 - ... the ruminantia especially, the molares are found to occupy the most conspicuous situation. But, in each of these instances, the other kinds of teeth are found to be proportionally of less importance, and in some cases are actually wanting. In man, on the contrary, every class appears to be equally developed, to a moderate, though a sufficient, degree, and to exhibit a perfection of structure, which may be considered as the true type, from which all other forms are mere deviations. It becomes,...
Seite 46 - ... much more than hypothetical. The endowment of reason, that greatest, best gift of the Creator, appears, if we consider the perfection of human organization, to be particularly, and, in its highest degree, even exclusively, adapted to the conformation and requirements of man. This high and divine endowment should never be lost sight of in our reasonings on the human structure, and the physiology and habits of our species ; as it is only with the allowances and modifications, which the possession...
Seite 47 - It is not my intention now to go further into the discussion of this subject, than to observe, that if analogy be allowed to have any weight in the argument, it is wholly on that side of the question which I have just taken. Those animals,, whose teeth and digestive apparatus most nearly resemble our own, namely, the apes and monkeys, are undoubtedly frugivorous...
Seite 47 - ... civilization, which, in a greater or less degree, must be allowed to exist in every known tribe of our species, — cannot be considered, in any one instance, as actually and exclusively natural; yet we may be led, by a careful examination of the structure of the different organs, and by an analogical comparison of them as they exist in man, with the same organs in those animals which most nearly resemble him in structure, but which are still found in a perfectly natural state, to a plausible...
Seite 29 - Nile, about one thousand five hundred miles from Cairo ; her pursuers were close upon her track, and bullet after bullet whizzed by the terrified animal, until at last a ball or two reached a mortal part, and she paused. Maternal love made her stop, she fled no more, she turned aside and made towards a heap of brushwood and waterbushes that grew on the banks of the river, and she sought that spot either to struggle for her life or die beside her young one.
Seite 29 - She could not reach it, her strength failed, she was unable to proceed so far, and sank dying beneath the water; but the action was so evident that her pursuers noticed it, and hastily proceeding to the clump they beat the bushes, and out rushed the young hippopotamus calf, plunging headlong down the river's bank.

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