Tamburlaine

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Courier Corporation, 2002 - 132 Seiten
From one of England's greatest playwrights, a remarkably inventive and poetically expressive work that set the form for later Elizabethan dramas. The 2-part romantic tragedy focuses on Tamburlaine — a Mongol warrior whose relentless rise to greatness and power, together with his enormous greed and vanity, culminates in his eventual downfall.
 

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Inhalt

Note
ACT THE FIRST
3
ACT THE SECOND
15
ACT THE THIRD
28
ACT THE FOURTH
41
ACT THE FIFTH
52
Tamburlaine
67
ACT THE FIRST
69
ACT THE SECOND
82
ACT THE THIRD
91
ACT THE FOURTH
106
ACT FIVE
118
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Über den Autor (2002)

Christopher Marlowe was born in Canterbury, England on February 6, 1564. He received a B.A. in 1584 and an M.A. in 1587 from Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. His original plans for a religious career were put aside when he decided to become a poet and playwright. His earliest work was translating Lucan and Ovid from Latin into English. He translated Vergil's Aeneid as a play. His plays included Tamburlaine the Great, Faustus, The Jew of Malta, and Dido, Queen of Carthage. His unfinished poem Hero and Leander was published in 1598. In 1589, he and a friend killed a man, but were acquitted on a plea of self-defense. His political views were unorthodox, and he was thought to be a government secret agent. He was arrested in May 1593 on a charge of atheism. He was killed in a brawl in a Deptford tavern on May 30, 1593.

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