Origins of English History

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B. Quaritch, 1890 - 450 Seiten
 

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Seite 284 - This I give to thee, preserve thou my horses ; this to thee, preserve thou my sheep; and so on.' After that, they use the same ceremony to the noxious animals : ' This I give to thee, O fox ! spare thou my lambs; this to thee, O hooded crow ! this to thee, 0 eagle !' When the ceremony is over, they dine on the caudle...
Seite 405 - Uxores habent deni duodenique inter se communes, et maxime fratres cum fratribus parentesque cum liberis ; sed, si qui sunt ex his nati, eorum habentur liberi, quo primum virgo quaeque deducta est.
Seite 209 - A bigger kind there is of them, called with us hobgoblins, and Robin Goodfellows, that would, in those superstitious times, grind corn for a mess of milk, cut wood, or do any manner of drudgery work.
Seite 283 - The rites begin with spilling some of the caudle on the ground, by way of libation: on that, every one takes a cake of oatmeal, upon which are raised nine square knobs, each dedicated to some particular being, the supposed preserver of their flocks and herds, or to some particular animal, the real destroyer of them: each person then turns his face to the fire, breaks off a knob, and flinging it over his shoulders, says, This I give to thee, preserve thou my horses; this to thee, preserve thou my...
Seite 406 - Ac fuit antea tempus, cum Germanos Galli virtute superarent, ultro bella inferrent, propter hominum multitudinem agrique inopiam trans Rhenum colonias mitterent.
Seite 377 - Cuthred met and overthrew him there, winning his banner, whereon was depicted a golden dragon ; in memory of which victory the custom of making a dragon yearly and carrying it up and down the town in great jollity on Midsummer Eve, to which they added the picture of a giant, was in all likelihood first instituted.
Seite 77 - And that is the reason why the sea in those parts is impassable and impenetrable, because there is such a quantity of shallow mud in the way; and this was caused by the subsidence of the island.
Seite 31 - A Woman sitting down, takes a handful of Corn, holding it by the Stalks in her left hand, and then sets fire to the Ears, which are presently in a flame ; she has a Stick in her right hand, which she manages very dexterously, beating off the Grain at the very Instant, when the Husk is quite burnt, for if she miss of that, she must use the Kiln ; but Experience has taught them this Art to perfection. The Corn may be so dressed, winowed, ground, and baked within an Hour after reaping from the Ground.
Seite 124 - To dwell in the cliffs of the valleys, In caves of the earth, and in the rocks. Among the bushes they brayed ; Under the nettles they were gathered together.

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