The Works of Benjamin Franklin: Containing Several Political and Historical Tracts Not Included in Any Former Edition, and Many Letters, Official and Private, Not Hitherto Published; with Notes and a Life of the Author, Band 3

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Hillard, Gray,, 1840

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Seite 321 - Every man in England seems to consider himself as a piece of a sovereign over America ; seems to jostle himself into the throne with the king, and talks of our subjects in the colonies.
Seite 73 - He that for giving a draught of water to a thirsty person, should expect to be paid with a good plantation, would be modest in. his demands, compared with those who think they deserve heaven for the little good they do on earth.
Seite 71 - His outward freedom : tyranny must be ; Though to the tyrant thereby no excuse. Yet sometimes nations will decline so low From virtue, which is reason, that no wrong, But justice, and some fatal curse annex'd, Deprives them of their outward liberty ; Their inward lost : witness the irreverent son Of him who built the ark ; who, for the shame Done to his father, heard this heavy curse, Servant of servants, on his vicious race.
Seite 260 - I have in a private capacity given just cause of offence to any one whatever), yet they are enemies, and very bitter ones; and you must expect their enmity will extend in some degree to you, so that your slightest indiscretions will be magnified into crimes, in order the more sensibly to wound and afflict me. It is therefore the more necessary for you to be extremely circumspect in all your behaviour, that no advantage may be given to their malevolence.
Seite 73 - I do not look upon myself as conferring favors, but as paying debts. In my travels, and since my settlement, I have received much kindness from men to whom I shall never have any opportunity of making the least direct return ; and numberless mercies from God, who is infinitely above being benefited by our services.
Seite 70 - In short, unless the stream of their importation could be turned from this to other colonies, as you very judiciously propose, they will soon so outnumber us that all the advantages we have will, in my opinion, be not able to preserve our language, and even our government will become precarious.
Seite 432 - I hope nothing that has happened, or may happen, will diminish in the least our Loyalty to our Sovereign, or Affection for this Nation in general. I can scarcely conceive a King of better Dispositions, of more exemplary Virtues, or more truly desirous of promoting the Welfare of all his Subjects.
Seite 194 - I would advise you to read with a pen in your hand, and enter in a little book short hints of what you find that is curious, or that may be useful; for this will be the best method of imprinting such particulars in your memory, where they will be ready, either for practice on some future occasion, if they are matters of utility, or at least to adorn and improve your conversation, if they are rather points of curiosity.
Seite 262 - What a tribute of praise had been due To the teacher and friend of mankind ! But, to covet political fame Was in him a degrading ambition; A spark that from Lucifer came, And kindled the blaze of sedition. Let Candour then write on his urn, Here lies the renowned inventor, Whose Flame to the skies ought to turn, But, inverted, descends to the centre.
Seite 513 - England; then, their necessities make them rapacious, their office makes them proud and insolent, their insolence and rapacity make them odious, and, being conscious that they are hated, they become malicious; their malice urges them to a continual abuse of the inhabitants in their letters to administration, representing them as disaffected and rebellious, and (to encourage the use of severity) as weak, divided, timid, and cowardly.

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