An essay concerning human understanding. To which are now first added, i. an analysis of mr. Locke's doctrine of ideas [&c., incl. some] extr. from the author's works

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Seite 81 - First. Our senses, conversant about particular sensible objects, do convey into the mind several distinct perceptions of things, according to those various ways wherein those objects do affect them; and thus we come by those ideas we have of yellow, white, heat, cold, soft, hard, bitter, sweet, and all those which we call sensible qualities...
Seite xxxiv - Let him study the Holy Scriptures, especially the New Testament. Therein are contained the words of eternal life. It has God for its author ; salvation for its end ; and truth without any mixture of error, for its matter.
Seite 82 - These two, I say, viz., external material things as the objects of sensation, and the operations of our own minds within as the objects of reflection, are, to me, the only originals from whence all our ideas take their beginnings.
Seite 276 - God; who will render to every man according to his deeds: to them who, by patient continuance in well-doing, seek for glory and honour and immortality, eternal life; but unto them that are contentious, and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, indignation and wrath: tribulation and anguish upon every soul of man that doeth evil...
Seite 14 - I shall not at present meddle with the physical consideration of the mind; or trouble myself to examine wherein its essence consists; or by what motions of our spirits or alterations of our bodies we come to have any sensation by our organs, or any ideas in our understandings; and whether those ideas do in their formation, any or all of them, depend on matter or not. These are speculations which, however curious and entertaining, I shall decline, as lying out of my way in the design I am now upon.
Seite 124 - The qualities, then, that are in bodies, rightly considered, are of three sorts. First, The bulk, figure, number, situation, and motion or rest of their solid parts ; those are in them, whether we perceive them or no ; and when they are of that size, that we can discover them, we have by these an idea of the thing, as it is in itself; as is plain in artificial things.
Seite 80 - ... and others : it is in the first place then to be inquired, How he comes by them?
Seite 120 - ... it being no more impossible to conceive that God should annex such ideas to such motions, with which they have no similitude, than that he should annex the idea of pain to the motion of a piece of steel dividing our flesh, with which that idea hath no resemblance.
Seite 130 - ... whether by his sight, before he touched them, he could now distinguish and tell which is the globe, which the cube?
Seite 118 - Such qualities, which in truth are nothing in the objects themselves, but powers to produce various sensations in us by their primary qualities, ie by the bulk, figure, texture, and motion of their insensible parts, as colours, sounds, tastes, &c.

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