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fect forms of the Graphic Art; Line-drawing—gt. Representation
of solid form in the Graphic Art—92. Graphic delineation as aided
by Perspectivk93. Aerial Perspective and its Study—94. Colour
in the Graphic Art—95. Texture in the Graphic Art—96. Light-
and-Shade in the Graphic Art . . . . Pages 111-152

C H A P T E R II

THE WORK or ART As SIGNIFICANT

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C H A P T E R I
ARCHITECTURAL BEAUTY m RELATION TO CONSTRUCTION

§§ 129. The elements of Architectural Effect—r30. Theory of Architec-

ture as ‘ Construction Beautified' — 131. The theory tested by

the Doric facade—I32. The Architect need not be ashamed of

Beauty, even when independent of construction—I33. Commence-

ment of the analysis of Construction in its relation to Beauty—-

134. Characteristics of building materials; Stone, and its Natural

Symbolism — :35. Brick, and the Constructive Forms evolved

from its use—136. The Arch, as derived from Construction in

small materials; its aesthetic value—I37. Evolution of an Arched

Style. The Arch at Rome—138. The Arch in the hands of

Mediaeval Builders. The Gothic Style—I39. Construction and

Beauty in the Gothic edifichuio. Free expression and Beauty

in Gothic, independent of Construction—I41. Summary of the

foregoing— r42. Monolithic Stone Construction in relation to

architectural Beauty—r43. Transference of Timber forms to Stone,

the secret of ancient Architecture—r44. An illustration from

ancient Egypt—145. The Columned Style originates in Wood-

Construction—I46. Characteristics of Construction in Wood—

147. These characteristics appear in the forms of the Greek Temple

--r48. Significance of the fact thus established—149. Use of the

forms thus established, as conventions, in later Architecture, as in

Roman and neo-classic work—15o. and even in the Gothic Style

—I5I. The Gothic Moulding as, in part, a conventional form—152.

Comparison of the early Christian Basilica with the later Mediaeval

Church . . . . . . . . . 209-251

CHAPTER II

THE CONVENTIONS OF SCULPTURE

§§ 153. Sculpture in the round begins with Realism. Examples from

Egypt—154. The Greeks established Conventions of the Art— 155. The value of Greek standards for modern practice—156. The primary Conventions of monumental Sculpture—157. Treatment in monumental work as influenced by Material and Scale—158. Conventions of Treatment in works designed for a nearer view;

' the handling of Bronze and Marble—159. The rendering of Natural

forms— 160. and their artistic handling, as illustrated in the Parthenon Fragments—16x. The general artistic result of these Conventions of Treatment— 162. Sculpturesque treatment as modified in later times—I63. Sculpture in Relief, its different kinds—164. The Conventions of Sculpture in Relief, as established by the Greeks—165. Relief Treatment as influenced by materials and processes; Greek and Italian Technique—166. The innovations of Ghiberti examined; their influence in modern Sculpture Pages 252-289

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CHAPTER III

PAINTING OLD AND NEW

§§ 167. The Limitations of Fresco Practice—168. The first stages of

_ ~182. The place of Technique in Modern Painting .

the advance; Linear Perspective—I69. and Foreshortening—17o. Aerial Perspective and Light-and-shade, necessary for further advance, were not fully mastered by the Italians—171. Light-andshade as used by the Italian painters—172. and as developed by Rembrandt and the Northerns — 173. Influence of the new treatment in extending the field of Painting—174. especially in regard to Landscape—A75. Summary of the foregoing—I76. The introduction of Oil-Painting and the ‘Tempera Style '—-I77. Importance of the change for the character of modern Painting— 178. Attitude of the Florentines towards the new Medium—I79. The Technique of Oil-Painting—Itio. The practice of Correggio and the Venetians—181. and of Rubens and the Flemish School 290-321

PART I

ART AS THE EXPRESSION OF POPULAR FEELINGS AND IDEALS

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