Tragedy of Doctor Faustus with Introduction and Notes

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Seite 52 - Cut is the branch that might have grown full straight, And burned is Apollo's laurel bough, That sometime grew within this learned man. Faustus is gone : regard his hellish fall, Whose fiendful fortune may exhort the wise Only to wonder at unlawful things, Whose deepness doth entice such forward wits To practise more than heavenly power permits.
Seite 50 - And then thou must be damn'd perpetually! Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of Heaven, That time may cease, and midnight never come; Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again and make Perpetual day; or let this hour be but A year, a month, a week, a natural day, That Faustus may repent and save his soul! O lente, lente, currite noctis equi!
Seite 15 - Abjure this magic, turn to God again!" Ay, and Faustus will turn to God again. To God? he loves thee not; The god thou serv'st is thine own appetite, Wherein is...
Seite 50 - You stars that reigned at my nativity, Whose influence hath allotted Death and Hell, Now draw up Faustus like a foggy mist...
Seite 47 - Though my heart pants and quivers to remember that I have been a student here these thirty years, O, would I had never seen Wittenberg, never read book ! And what wonders I have done, all Germany can witness, yea, all the world...
Seite 11 - O, by aspiring pride and insolence ; For which God threw him from the face of heaven.
Seite 4 - All things that move between the quiet poles Shall be at my command. Emperors and kings Are but obeyed in their several provinces, Nor can they raise the wind or rend the clouds; But his dominion that exceeds in this Stretcheth as far as doth the mind of man. A sound magician is a mighty god : Here, Faustus, try thy brains to gain a deity.
Seite 51 - O, no end is limited to damned souls ! Why wert thou not a creature wanting soul? Or why is this immortal that thou hast? Ah, Pythagoras' metempsychosis ! were that true, This soul should fly from me, and I be changed Unto some brutish beast!
Seite 44 - And I will combat with weak Menelaus, And wear thy colours on my plumed crest; Yea, I will wound Achilles in the heel, And then return to Helen for a kiss.
Seite 11 - Why, this is hell, nor am I out of it. Think'st thou that I, who saw the face of God, And tasted the eternal joys of heaven, Am not tormented with ten thousand hells, In being depriv'd of everlasting bliss ? O, Faustus, leave these frivolous demands, Which strike a terror to my fainting soul ! Faust.

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