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THE

COMPLETE ANGLER

AND

HUNTSMAN

BY

THOMAS HUBERT, HUTTON

AND
STANLEY BLAKE

BERRY, KENTUCKY

1919

Copyright, 1919,

By

Thomas Hubert Hutton and Stanley Blake.

SK41
H73

INTRODUCTORY

PART ONE

The author of Part One of this book was born and reared among the hills of Old Kentucky, and has always been a close student of nature-a lover of the outdoors, and, above all, an ardent angler-a true disciple of "Ike” Walton.

Thomas Hubert Hutton was born in the year 1892 at the country town of Berry, County of Harrison, State of Kentucky, where he still resides.

He has written for the leading outdoor magazines for many years, having penned over 500 magazine articles on various subjects, both of angling and hunting.

For several years he was associated with the Blue Grass Farm Kennels, of which Mr. Stanley Blake, author of Part Two of this book, is Manager, and enjoyed always the most pleasant relations with that gentleman. Mr. Hutton, at the time this book was published, held the position of Postmaster, at the town wherein he is a resident.

While his principal recreative sport is angling for the battling black bass, he also finds time occasionally to accompany his friends on a hunt.

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PREFACE.

NATURE'S CALL:

There is instilled within each one of us a persistent something that we call “desire.” There are various things to be desired-some desire one thing, some another; some have many and numerous desires, while others may have but few. It is a safe bet, however, that all of us experience one desire that we cannot get away fromnamely the desire to respond to nature's persistent call.

This call cannot be evaded. It may be postponed, but it ever keeps on tugging at our heartstrings, and must be finally answered. For a time, nature's call may be neglected, forgotten in the busy struggle along life's tempestuous way, but the call will return again and again, and must be responded to.

There is a something within each of us—a desire—to commune with nature; no matter where we live, or what our calling. The city-bred man especially has a constant yearning to get out and away from all the noise and bustle and strife for a quiet vacation-time among the hills and along the cool streams, there to try his skill and pit his knowl-. edge and resourcefulness against nature's own, while those living in the smaller centers of population and in the rural districts experience and answer the same call. All of us have this great desire, and fortunate indeed is the man who is able to answer the call promptly. A great army of would-be sportsmen, however, on account of their

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