Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Due the U. States, 31st March,
June 30. Warrants drawn, - -
Compensation due, - -
Due the U. States, June 30, -
Sept. 30. Wariants drawn, - -
Compensation due, - -
Due the U. States, 30th Sept. -
Dec. 31. Warrants drawn, - -
Compensation due, - -
1793 Due the U. States, 31st Dec. -
March 31. Warrants drawn - -
Compensation due, - -
Due the U. States, 31st March -
June 30. Warrants drawn - -
Compensation due, - -
Due the U. States, 30th June -
Sept. 30. Warrants drawn, - -
Compensation due, - -
Due the U. States, 30th Sept. -
Dec. 31. Warrants drawn, - -

Compensation due, - -

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

DOLLARS.

1794 Due the U. States, 31st Dec. - 5404
March 31. Warrants drawn, - - 5,000

10,404
Compensation due, - - 6,250

Due the U. States. 31st March, '-: 4^54
June 30. Warrants drawn, - * 6,000

10,154
Compensation due, - - 6,250

Due the U. States, 30th June, - 3.904

Sept. 30. Warrants drawn, - - 7,000

10,904
Compensation due, - - 6,250

Due the U. States, 30th Sept. - 4>654

Dec. 31. Warrants drawn, - - 6^000

.10,654
Compensation due, - . - 6,250

1795 Due the U. States, 31st Dec. - 4,4°4
March 31. Warrants drawn, - - 7,000

11,404
Compensation due, - - 6,250

Due the U. States, 31st March, - 5.*54

June 30. Warrants drawn, - - 4,000

9.154
Compensation due, - - 6,250

Due the U. States, 30th June, - 2,904

Sept. 30. Warrants drawn, . - - 2,500

5.404
Compensation due, - - 6,250

Due the President 30th Sep. 1795, 846

Vol. iv. G g PROOi1

DOLLAR".

PROOF.

Compensation from April 30, to June 30, 1789,

62 days, - 4.246

Compensation from July 1, 1789, to Sept. 30,

1795, 6 years 3 months, - - 156,250

'. Total due Dots. 160,496

Advanced till the end of 1791, per printed statement, - - -* - 72,150 Ditto in 1792, «'. - '- 22,500 Ditto in 1793, . - - - 27.500 Ditto in 1794, - 24,000 Ditto in 1795, to Sept. 30, - <^- 13,500 <« ."

i59,6

* Balance due the President, 846

Dols. 160,49*

Treasury Department, Register's Office, Nov. 13, 1795.

Extracted from the Books of the Treasury,

JOSEPH NOURSE, Register.

* This abstract establishes one unpleasant and embarrassing fa£l; to wit, that General Washington, instead of refusing to accept of any salary (which his admirers have said was the case), actually overdrew his salary, and had, from June 3/90 to June 1795. constantly several thousands of dollars of the public money in his hands.—Whether he really did let this money out at usutious interest, as it was asserted, will, perhaps, never be known.

Tie

The following Artkle, which was published in Bache's Paper of the list December 1796, will. prove that there were other reasons for the Generafs retiring, which he did not thmM proper to state. v •'

"The President seem* to arrogate great merit to* himself on account of his disinterestedness, and in this he, no -ttoubt includes his declension to serve again. The disinterestedness on this latter score is father questionable; for his unwillingness to be a candidate seems to have arisen rather from a consciousness that he would not be re-elected, than a want of ambition or lust of power. It was well understood that many of the republicans of the constitution were determined to give him opposition, and the nature of the United States promised success to the plan. Nothing was more easy than to make him a Pice-President by uniting the republican suffrages in favour of John Adams and subtracting even a few votes from him—He was probably apprized of the scheme, and to save himself from the mortification and disgrace of being superseded, he cunningly declined.—It may be thought singular, that John Adams, who is a professed aristocrat, should be preferred by republicans to George Washington; but an examination into the case will make the preference appear very plain and desirable. There can be no doubt that Adams would not be a puppet—that having an opinion and judgment of his own, he would act from his own impulses rather than the impulses of others —that possessing great integrity, he would not sacrifice his country's interests at the shrine of party —and that being an enemy to the corruptions which have taken place bvTneans of funding jind bank systems, he would not lend his aid to the further prostitution of the American character—In addition to these considerations, it is well known that Adams is an aristocrat only in theory, but that Washington is one in praclice—that Adams has the simplicity of a republican, but that WashingTon has the ostentation of an eastern bashaw—tha.t Adams holds none of his fellow men in slavery, but that Washington does. Considerations so imperious could leave no hesitation on the mind3 of republicans to which of the-two to give the preference—The difference is immense, and no friend to republicanism would hesitare one moment in giving a preference to John Adams *.

* It is very true, that the man who published this article was a grandson of old Franklin, and possessed all the villainy of his grandfather; but, where such an article could find its way into a public paper, there must have been some part of the community with whose opinions it coincided. The true cause of the general's retiring was, however, the loss'of popularity which he had experienced, and the further loss which he apprehended from the rupture with France, which he looked upon as inevitable.

END OP WASHINGTON S RETIRING, AND OF
THE FOURTH vOLUME.

[merged small][ocr errors]
« ZurückWeiter »