Looking Into the Seeds of Time: The Price of Modern Development

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Transaction Publishers - 443 Seiten

This refreshing work combines the history of economics and the practice of modern development. As all living is action, and living implies choices, any theory of devel-opment must start with the person. Modern life reflects the fears of a society trying to escape the anxieties, demons, and ghosts of a long dark era of unemployment and starvation. The problem of development is the contradiction between technological potentials and cultural inheritances.

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Inhalt

The Beginnings of Economic Development
1
Production Stimulated Growth the Role of Exports in the Development of Britain and Japan with a Discussion of the Growth Delaying Factors in Co...
29
Demand Stimulated Growth the Role of the Domestic Market in the Development of the USA
59
The SocioCultural Landscape Europe on the Eve of the Reformation
81
The World Begins to Move Reformation to the Age of Reason
121
The World in Motion The Struggle between the Medieval and the Bourgeois Value Systems
143
The Ascent of the Bourgeoisie and the Rise of Utilitarianism
189
Dynamic Equilibrium The Era of Bourgeois Consolidation
235
The Rise of Egalitarian Society
301
The Great Era of Prosperity
333
Towards the Future
397
Index
427
Urheberrecht

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Seite 166 - The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction than the affirmation, that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively false, it would imply a contradiction, and could never...
Seite 143 - These late eclipses in the sun and moon portend no good to us : though the wisdom of nature can reason it thus and thus, yet nature finds itself scourged by the sequent effects : love cools, friendship falls off, brothers divide : in cities, mutinies ; in countries, discord ; in palaces, treason ; and the bond cracked 'twixt son and father.
Seite xi - If you can look into the seeds of time, And say, which grain will grow, and which will not, Speak then to me, who neither beg, nor fear, Your favours, nor your hate.
Seite 145 - I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed is at a year old a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled; and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee or a ragout.
Seite 7 - ... trying to understand the mechanism of a closed watch. He sees the face and the moving hands, even hears its ticking, but he has no way of opening the case. If he is ingenious he may form some picture of a mechanism which could be responsible for all the things he observes, but he may never be quite sure his picture is the only one which could explain his observations. He will never be able to compare his picture with the real mechanism and he cannot even imagine the possibility or the meaning...
Seite 147 - After all, I am not so violently bent upon my own opinion as to reject any offer proposed by wise men which shall be found equally innocent, cheap, easy, and effectual. But before something of that kind shall be advanced in contradiction to my scheme and offering a better, I desire the author or authors will be pleased maturely to consider two -points: first, as things now stand, how they will be able to find...
Seite 189 - To take an example, therefore, from a very trifling manufacture ; but one in which the division of labour has been very often taken notice of, the trade of the pin-maker; a workman not educated to this business (which the division of labour has rendered a distinct trade), nor acquainted with the use of the machinery employed in it (to the invention of which the same division of labour has probably given occasion), could scarce, perhaps, with his utmost industry, make one pin in a day, and certainly...

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