United States from the Landing of Columbus to the Signing of the Peace Protocol with Spain, Band 2

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P. F. Collier, 1898
 

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Seite 640 - No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible hand which conducts the affairs of men more than the people of the United States. Every step by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency...
Seite 492 - I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country...
Seite 617 - With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Seite 618 - ... doubtful war. Called upon by your country to defend its invaded rights, you accepted the sacred charge, before it had formed alliances, and whilst it was without funds or a government to support you. You have conducted the great military contest with wisdom and fortitude, invariably regarding the rights of the civil power through all disasters and changes.
Seite 631 - On the whole, sir, I cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the Convention who may still have objections to it, would with me, on this occasion, doubt a little of his own infallibility, and to make manifest our unanimity, put his name to this instrument.
Seite 606 - Let me conjure you, then, if you have any regard for your country, concern for yourself, or posterity, or respect for me, to banish these thoughts from your mind, and never communicate, as from yourself or any one else, a sentiment of the like nature.
Seite 606 - With a mixture of great surprise and astonishment, I have read with attention the sentiments you have submitted to my perusal. Be assured, sir, no occurrence in the course of the war has given me more painful sensations, than your information of there being such ideas existing in the army, as you have expressed, and I must view with abhorrence, and reprehend with severity...
Seite 651 - HERE on this very spot, I took leave of him ; I wished him success and honor ; you have your instructions, I said, from the Secretary of War, I had a strict eye to them, and will add but one word — BEWARE OF A SURPRISE.
Seite 651 - He went off with that as my last solemn warning thrown into his ears. And yet ! to suffer that army to be cut to pieces — hacked, butchered, tomahawked — by a surprise — the very thing I guarded him against!
Seite 695 - I expressed them therefore with great hesitation ; but whatever be their degree of talent it is no measure of their rights. Because Sir Isaac Newton was superior to others in understanding, he was not therefore lord of the person or property of others.

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