A Glossary: Or, Collection of Words, Phrases, Names, and Allusions to Customs, Proverbs, Etc., which Have Been Thought to Require Illustration, in the Works of English Authors, Particularly Shakespeare, and His Contemporaries, Band 1

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Reeves and Turner, 1888 - 981 Seiten

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Seite 269 - My pulse, as yours, doth temperately keep time, And makes as healthful music : it is not madness That I have utter'd : bring me to the test, And I the matter will re-word ; which madness Would gambol from.
Seite 262 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid, on a dolphin's back, Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song ; And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Seite 28 - THE ILIADS OF HOMER, Prince of Poets, never before in any Language truly translated, with a Comment on some of his chief Places. Done according to the Greek by GEORGE CHAPMAN, with Introduction and Notes by the Rev.
Seite 349 - Give me my Romeo, and when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine, That all the world will be in love with night, And pay no worship to the garish Sun.
Seite 273 - His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Seite 7 - tis most certain, Iras. Saucy lictors Will catch at us, like strumpets ; and scald rhymers Ballad us out o' tune : the quick comedians Extemporally will stage us, and present Our Alexandrian revels : Antony Shall be brought drunken forth, and I shall see Some squeaking Cleopatra boy my greatness I
Seite 465 - The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre, Observe degree, priority, and place, Insisture, course, proportion, season, form, Office, and custom, in all line of order...
Seite 233 - Be content; Your low-laid son our godhead will uplift: His comforts thrive, his trials well are spent.
Seite 160 - Shirley's Works, vol. iv. p. 298. Nares (in his Gloss.) quotes what follows from Blount's Glossography : " Chrisome (a xplia [to anoint — with the holy oil formerly used in baptism]) signifies properly the white cloth which is set by the minister of baptism upon the head of a child newly anointed with chrism after his baptism. Now it is vulgarly taken for the white cloth put about or upon a child newly christened, in token of his baptism ; wherewith the women use to shroud the child, if dying within...
Seite 390 - O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and noise: I would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod: Pray you, avoid it.

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