Educational Foundations: A Text Book for the Professional Teacher, Band 21

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A.S. Barnes, 1909

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Seite 227 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of triie virtue, which, being united to the heavenly grace of faith, makes up the highest perfection.
Seite 460 - Indians; we explore the heavens above, the earth beneath, and the waters under the earth — all these we do, and much more without the waving of bloody shirts or the planting of party platforms.
Seite 95 - When I was yet a child, no childish play To me was pleasing ; all my mind was set Serious to learn and know, and thence to do What might be public good; myself I thought Born to that end, born to promote all truth, All righteous things...
Seite 228 - But because our understanding cannot in this body found itself but on sensible things, nor arrive so clearly to the knowledge of God and things invisible, as by orderly conning over the visible and inferior creature, the same method is necessarily to be followed in all discreet teaching.
Seite 231 - For their studies: first, they should begin with the chief and necessary rules of some good grammar, either that now used, or any better; and while this is doing, their speech is to be fashioned to a distinct and clear pronunciation, as near as may be to the Italian, especially in the vowels.
Seite 232 - At the same time, some other hour of the day might be taught them the rules of arithmetic, and, soon after, the elements of geometry, even playing, as the old manner was.
Seite 237 - First, to find out a spacious house and ground about it, fit for an academy, and big enough to lodge a hundred and fifty persons, whereof twenty or thereabout may be attendants, all under the government of one, who shall be thought of desert sufficient and ability either to do all, or wisely to direct and oversee it done. This place should be at once both school and university...
Seite 226 - To tell you therefore what I have benefited herein among old renowned authors, I shall spare ; and to search what many modern Januas and Didactics, more than ever I shall read, have projected, my inclination leads me not.
Seite 228 - And though a linguist should pride himself to have all the tongues that Babel cleft the world into, yet if he have not studied the solid things in them as well as the words and lexicons, he were nothing so much lo be esteemed a learned man, as any yeoman or tradesman competently wise in his mother dialect only.
Seite 235 - Then also those poets which are now counted most hard, will be both facile and pleasant, Orpheus, Hesiod, Theocritus, Aratus, Nicander, Oppian, Dionysius; and in Latin, Lucretius, Manilius, and the rural part of Virgil.

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