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GENERAL LAWS,

JOINT RESOLUTIONS, MEMORIALS, AND PRIVATE ACTS,

PASSED AT THE

SIXTH SESSION

br THE

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY

OF THE

TERRITORY OF COLORADO.

CONVENED AT GOLDEN CITY, ON THE THIRD DAY OF DECEMBER, 1866.

TOGETHER WITH THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, THE

CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES,

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DAVID C. COLLIER, PRINTER, MINERS' REGISTER OFFICE.

Law School, Harrand University

from
Trudy. Holland,
Librariau, Supreme Court

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FEDERAL OFFICERS OF THE TERRITORY.

GOVERNOR,
ALEXANDER CUMMINGS.

SECRETARY,
FRANK HALL.

JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT.

CHIEF JUSTICE,

MOSES HALLETT. WILLIAM R. GORSLINE, ASSOCIATE JUSTICE, C. S. EYSTER,

ATTORNEY GENERAL,
GEO. W. CHAMBERLAIN.

MARSHAL,
U. B. HOLLOWAY.

ABB'T TREASURER, AND SUP'T U. 6. MINT,

GEORGE W. LANE.

SURVEYOR GENERAL,
JOHN PIERCE.

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.

IN CONGRESS, JULY 4, 1776.

THE UNANIMOUS DECLARATION OF THE THIRTEEN UNITED STATES

OF AMERICA.

When, in the course of human events, it becomes' riecessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which hàve connected them with another, and to assume, among the powerg of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind, requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed ; that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate, that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly, all experience hath shown, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves, by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and

provide new guards for their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these colonies, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former systems of govern

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