The Transactions of the Microscopical Society of London, Band 7

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John Van Voorst, 1859
 

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Seite 249 - Gne hairs scattered over the surface ; after carefully examining which, he pronounced with confidence that they were human hairs, and such as grew on the naked parts of the body ; and still further, that the person who had owned them was of a fair complexion. "This was a very interesting decision, because the fragment of skin was taken from the door of an old church in Yorkshire ;* in the vicinity of which a tradition...
Seite 109 - Y. ON THE MODE OF FORMATION OF SHELLS OF ANIMALS, OF BONE, AND OF SEVERAL OTHER STRUCTURES, by a Process of Molecular Coalescence, Demonstrable in certain Artificially-formed Products.
Seite 260 - Have ready a spatula bearing a quantity of equally inspissated balsam warmed until it flows, with which cover the specimen, and then immediately warm the slide, being careful to employ the least possible heat. Now carefully depress the section, and withdraw every air bubble with a stout needle set in a handle towards the ends of the slide : put on the cover glass, slightly warmed, not flat, but allowing one edge to touch the balsam first, press out superfluous balsam, and the specimen is safe. The...
Seite 39 - The cartilage connected with the inferior arch of the penultimate centrum is therefore an " interhaemal " cartilage. The anterior part of the inferior surface of the terminal ossification likewise has its osseous inferior arch(/' but the direction of this is nearly vertical, and though it is connected below with an element...
Seite 126 - When the occurrence was first made known to me, I suggested that the bees might probably have died from the growth of a fungus, and requested some of the dead bees might be sent to me for examination. They were transmitted to me in a very dry state, and a careful inspection with a lens afforded no indication of vegetable growth. I then broke up a specimen and examined the portions with a compound microscope, using a Nachet, No. 4. The head and thorax were clean...
Seite 74 - Schwam on the animal cell ; and we may directly trace the present position of animal physiology to the wonderful influence that the researches of Brown have exerted upon the investigation of the laws of organization. Even in zoology the influence of Brown's researches may be traced in the interest attached to the history of development in all its recent systems of classification. Brown had, in fact, in the beginning of the present century, grasped the great ideas of growth and development, which...
Seite 140 - ... though slight degree of adhesiveness which retains them pretty firmly attached together when in the position most favourable for its operation, namely when flat surface is applied to flat surface, but otherwise allows them to slip very readily upon one another." The aggregating tendency of the red disks is thus regarded as a phenomenon similar in kind, though inferior in degree, to the well-known adhesiveness of the white corpuscles. It is further shown, from numerous experiments, that the red...
Seite 53 - Seeing then that the fungi are characterised throughout nature by feeding on effete or decayed matter, that the fungi supposed to be peculiar to certain diseases of the skin are also found in many other diseases of the cutaneous surface, that competent observers have not been able to find them in these peculiar diseases, that sporules and filaments described as the cause of one...
Seite 127 - I placed four of the dead bees in circumstances favourable for the germination of the spores, and in about ten days I submitted them again to examination. They were covered with mould, consisting chiefly of a species of Mucor, and one also of Botrytis or Botryosporium. These fungi were clearly extraneous, covering indifferently all parts of the insects, and spreading on the wood on which they were lying. On the abdomen of all the specimens, and on the clypeus of one of them, grew a fungus wholly...
Seite 140 - ... the passage of the latter into the pores of the former, except in so far as they are attracted by the tissues for the purposes of nutrition. The heart is believed by the author to be the sole cause of the circulation of the blood in the frog's foot, and it is proved experimentally that other sources of movement cannot have more than a very trivial influence, and that their cessation, supposing them to exist at all, does not give rise to arrest of the blood or accumulation of corpuscles in the...

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