Sallust, Florus, and Velleius Paterculus, literally tr. with notes, by J.S. Watson

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Seite 357 - Adam the goodliest man of men since born His sons, the fairest of her daughters Eve.
Seite 29 - Behind him cast; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the moon, whose orb Through optic glass the Tuscan artist views, At evening, from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty globe.
Seite 55 - I had rather speak of those instances in which our ancestors, in opposition to the impulse of passion, acted with wisdom and sound policy. In the Macedonian war, which we carried on against King Perses, the great and powerful state of Rhodes, which had risen by the aid of the...
Seite 1 - There wanted yet the master-work, the end Of all yet done ; a creature, who not prone And brute as other creatures, but endued With sanctity of reason, might erect His stature, and upright with front serene Govern the rest, self-knowing ; and from thence Magnanimous to correspond with heaven...
Seite 121 - Ba^bius, a tribune of the people, by whose audacity he hoped to be protected against the law, and against all harm. An assembly of the people being convoked, Memmius, although they were violently exasperated against Jugurtha (some demanding that he should be cast into prison, others that, unless he should name his accomplices in guilt...
Seite 14 - Who dares think one thing, and another tell, My heart detests him as the gates of hell.
Seite 1 - Thus, while the mute creation downward bend Their sight, and to their earthly mother tend, Man looks aloft ; and with erected eyes Beholds his own hereditary skies.
Seite 286 - ... for men and arms, and we may therefore call it its youth. The next period was one of two hundred years, to the time of Caesar Augustus, in which it subdued the whole world ; this may accordingly be called the manhood, and robust maturity, of the empire. From the reign of...
Seite 73 - Your spirit, your age, your valour, give me confidence ; to say nothing of necessity, which makes even cowards brave. To prevent the numbers of the enemy from surrounding us, our confined situation is sufficient. But should Fortune be unjust to your...
Seite 76 - When the battle was over, it was plainly seen what boldness, and what energy of spirit, had prevailed throughout the army of Catiline ; for, almost everywhere, every soldier, after yielding up his breath, covered with his corpse the spot which he had occupied when alive. A few, indeed, whom the praetorian cohort had dispersed, had fallen somewhat differently, but all with wounds in front. Catiline himself was found, far in advance of his men, among the dead bodies of the enemy ; he was not quite...

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