The British Plutarch [by T. Mortimer].

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Seite 379 - in the following lines, written by Dryden under his picture. Three poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England, did adorn. The first, in loftiness of thought surpass'd? ' The next, in majesty; in both, the last: The force of Nature, could no further go ; To make a third she
Seite 370 - -As when the sun new-risen Looks through the horizontal misty air, Shorn of his beams; or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs.
Seite 346 - Gallant and gay, in Cliveden's proud alcove, The bow'r of wanton Shrewsbury and love ; Or just as gay at council, in a ring Of mimic statesmen, and their merry king; No wit to flatter left, of all his store ! « No fool to laugh at, which he valued more. There, victor of
Seite 67 - amongst others here mentioned, do make this protestation following. That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of parliament, are the ancient and undoubted birth-right and inheritance of .the subjects of England ; and the -maintenance and .making of laws, and .redress .of mischiefs and grievances which daily
Seite 156 - a great lover and praiser of himself; a contemner and scorner of others ; choosing rather to lose his friend than his jest; jealous of every word and action of those about him, especially after drink, which was one of the elements in which he
Seite 379 - born, Greece, Italy, and England, did adorn. The first, in loftiness of thought surpass'd? ' The next, in majesty; in both, the last: The force of Nature, could no further go ; To make a third she
Seite 345 - Pope: Behold what blessings wealth to life can lend! And see what comfort it affords our end! In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half-hung, The floors of plaister, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-ty'd curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed, Where
Seite 226 - the president, boldly answered, " Sir, we have heard what you did at the house in the morning; and before many hours, all England will hear of it ; but, sir, you are mistaken to think that the parliament is dissolved, for no power under heaven can dissolve them but themselves £ therefore take you notice of that.
Seite 67 - house itself), for or concerning any speaking, reasoning, or declaring of any matter or -matters •touching the parliament, or parliament business; and .that, if any of the said members be complained of and questioned for any thing done or said in ^parliament, ,the same is to be shewed to the king,
Seite 101 - power and interest was greater to do good or hurt than any man's in the kingdom, or than any man of his rank hath had in any time; for his reputation of honesty was universal, and his affections seemed so publicly guided, that no corrupt or private ends could bias them.

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