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8. Having queen, knave, and small cards, play the knave. Because you will, in great probability, secure a trick in that suit.

9. Having queen, ten, and small ones, play a small one. For your partner has an equal chance to win the trick.

10. Having either ace, king, queen, or knave, with small cards, play a small one. For your partner has an equal chance to win the trick.

11. Having either ace, king, green, or knave, with one small card only, play a small one. For otherwise the adversary will finesse upou you in that suit.

12. If a queen is led, and you hold the king, put it on. For if your partner holds the are, you do no harm; and if the king is taken, the adversaries have played two ho.

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nours to one.

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the queen.

13. If a knave is led, and vou hold the queen, put it on. For, at the worst, you bring down two honours for

14. If a king is led, and you hold the ace, knave, and small ones. play the ace. For it cannot do the adversaries a greater injury.

Third Hando 1. Having ace and king, play the ace, and return the king. Because you are not to keep the command of your partner's strong suit. 2. Having ace and queen, play the ace, and return

For although it mav prove better in some cases to put on the queen, vet, in general, your partner is best supported by the above method.

3. Having ace and knave, play the ace, and return the knave. The koave is returned in order to strengthen your partner's hand.

4. Having king and knave, play the king; and if it wins, return the knave. Because it will strengthen your partner's hand.

5. Always put on the best when vour partner leads a small card. 'Because it best supports your partner's hand.

6. If you hold the ace and one small card only, and your partner leads the king, put on the ace and return the small one. For otherwise your ace will be an obstruction to his suit.

7. If you hold the king and one small card only, and

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your partner leads the ace; if the trumps are out, it is good play to put on the king. For by putting on the king, there is no obstruction to the suit.

Fourth Hand, 1. If a king is led, and you hold ace, knave, and a small card, play the small one. For supposing the queen to follow, you will probably make both ace and knave.

2. When the third hand is weak in his partner's suit, you may often return that suit to great advantage. But this rule must not be applied to trumps, unless you are very strong indeed. Cases in which you should return your Partner's Lead

immediately. 1. When you win with the ace, and can return an bonour. For then it will greatly strengthen his hand.

2. When he leads a truinp. in which case return the best remaining in your hand (unless you hold four ori. ginally :) an exception to this arises if the lead is through an honour.

3. When your partner has trumped out. For then it is evident he wants to make his great suit.

4. When you have no good card in any other suit. For then you are entirely dependent on your partner. Cases in which you should not return your Partner's

Lead immediately. 1. If you win with the king, queen, and knave, and have only small cards remaining. For the return of a small card will more distress than strengthen your partner.

2. If you hold a good sequence. For then you may show a strong suit, and not injure his hand.

3. If you have a strong suit. Because leading from a strong suit is a direction to your partner, and cannot in. jure him.

4. If you have a good hand. For in this case you have a right to consult your own hand, and not your partner's.

5. If you hold five trumps. For then you are warranted to play trumps, if you think it right.

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Of leading Trumps. 1. Lead trumps from a strong hand, but never from a weak one By which means you will secure your good cards froin being trumped.

2. Trump not out witn a bad hand, although you hold five small trups.

For since your cards are bad, it is only trumping for the adversaries' good ones.

3. Having ace, king, knave, and three small trumps, play ace and king For the probability of the queen's falling is in your favour.

4. Having ace, king, knave, and one or two mall trumps, play the king, and wait the return from your partner to put on the knave. This method is in order to win the queen; but if you have particular reasons to wish the trumps out, play two rounds of trumps, and then your strong suit.

5. Having ace, king, and two or three small trumps, lead a small one. This method is with a view to let your partner win the first trick ; but if you have good reason for getting out the trumps, play three rounds, or play ace and king, and then proceed with your strong suit.

6. If your adversaries are eight, and you hold no honour, throw off your best trump. For if

your partner has not two honours, you have lost the game, and if he holds two honours, it is most advantageous for you to lead a trump

7. Having ace, queen, knave, and small trumps, play the knave. For by this means only the king can make against you.

8. Having ace, queen, ten, and one or two small trumps, lead a small one For it will give your partner a chance to win the trick, and keep the command in your own hand.

9. Having king, queen, ten, and small trumps, lead the king. Or if the king is lost, upon the return of trumps you may finesse the ten.

10. Having king, knave, ten, and small ones, lead the knave. Because it will prevent the adversaries from making a small trump. 11. Having queen, knave, nine, and smaller trumps,

For if your partner holds the ace, you have a good chance of making the whole suit.

12. Having queen, knave, and two or three small

lead the queen.

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trumps, lead the queen. For if your partner holds the ace, you have a good chance for making the whole suit.

13. Having knave, ten, eight, and small trumps, lead the koave. For on the return of trumps you probably may finesse the eight to advantage.

14. Having knave, ten, and three small trumps, lead the knave. Because it will most distress your adversaries, unless two honours are held on your right hand; the odds against which are about three to one.

15. Having only small trumps, begin with the highest. By this play you will support your partner all you

16. Having a sequence, begin with the highest. By this means your partner is best instructed how to play his hand, and cannot possibly be injured.

17. If an honour is turned up on your left, and the game much against you, lead a trump the first opportu. niiy. For your gaine being desperately bad, this method is the most likely to retrieve it.

18. In all other cases it is dangerous leading through an honour, unless you are strong in trumps, or have a good hand.

Because all the advantage of truinping through an honour, lies in the finessing of your partner.

Suppose it proper to lead Trumps. 19. If an honour is turned up on your left, and you hold only one honour with a small truinp, throw off the honour, and next the small one. Because it will greatly strengthen your partner's hand, and cannot hurt your own.

20. If an honour is turned up on the left, and you hold a sequence, lead the highest of it. Because it will prevent the last hand from injuring your partner.

21. If a queen is turned up on the left, and you hold ace, king, and a small one, lead the small trump. Because you will have a chance for getting the queen. 22. If a queen is turned up on your left, and

you

hoid the knave, with small ones, lead the knave For the knave can be of no service, since the queen is on your left.

23. If an honour is turned up by your you are strong in trumps, lead a small one ; but if weak in them, lead the best you have. By this play the weakest hand will support the strongest. 24. If an ace is turned up on your right, and you hold

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king, queen, and knave, lead the knave, for it is a se cure lead.

25. If an ace is turned up on the right, and you hold king, queen, and ten, lead the king; and upon the return of trumps, play the ten. For by this means you show a great strength to your partner, and will probably make two tricks in them.

26. If a king is turned up on the right, and you hold a queen, koave, and nine, lead the knave; and upon the return of trumps, play the nine. Because it may prevent the ten from making.

27. If a king is turned up on your right, and you hold knave, ten, and nine, lead the nine. Because this method will best disclose your strength in trumps.

28. If a queen is turned up on the right, and you hold ace, king, and knave, lead the king: and upon the return of trumps, play the koave. Because you are certain to make the knave.

29. If a queen is turned up on the right, and you hold ace, king, and small ones, lead the king; and upon the return of trumps, you may finesse, unless the queen falls, for otherwise the queen will make a trick.

30. If a knave is turned up on the right, and you hold king, queen, and ten, lead the queen; and upon the return of trumps, play the ten. For by these means you will make the ten.

31. If a knave is turned up on the right, and you hold king, queen, and small ones, lead the king; and if that comes home, play a small one. For it is probable your partner holds the ace.

32. If a knave is turned up on the right, and you hold king ten, or queen ten, with two small cards, lead a small one: and upon the return of trumps, play the ten. For it is five to four that your partner holds one honour.

When

you
turn

up an Honour.
1. If you turn up an ace, and hold only one small
trump with it. if either adversary leads the king, put on
the ace.

For it can do the adversaries no greater injury. 2. If you turn up an ace, and hold two or three sinall trumps with it, and either adversary lead the king, put on a small one. For if you play the ace, you give up the cominand in trumps

3. If you turn up a king, and hold only one small trump with it, and your right hand adversary leads a

1

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