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B The rook gives check at the white king's bi

shop's 2d square. 38. W The king at his queen's bishop's 3d square.

B The rook takes the pawn. 39. W The rook's pawn two steps. k

B The king's knight's pawn one step. 40. W The rook's pawn one.move.

B The knight's pawn one move. 41. W The rook at its king's square.

B The knight's pawn one move. 42. W The rook at its king's knight's square.

B. The rook gives check. 43. W The king at his queen's bishop's 4th square.

B The rook at the white king's knight's 3d square. 44. W The rook's pawn one move.

B The rook at its knight's 2d square. 45. W The king takes the pawn.

B The rook's pawn one move. 46. W The king at the black queen's knight's 3d

square. B The rook's pawn one move. 47. W The rook's pawn one move. B The rook takes the

pawn.

2 48. W The rook takes the pawn. m

B The rook at the king's rook's 2d square. 49. W The pawn two steps.

B The pawn one step.. 50. W The rook at its king's rook's 2d square.

B The king at his knight's 2d square. 51. W The pawn one move. B The king's at his knight 3d square.

k If, instead of pushing this pawn, you bad taken his pawn with your rook, you had lost the game; because your king would have hindered your rook from coming in time to stop the passage of his knight's pawn. This may be seen by playing over the same moves.

1 If he did not take your pawn, you must have taken his; and that would have given you the game.

m Thus, if instead of taking his pawn, you bad taken his rook, you had lost the game.

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52. W The king at the black queen's bishop's 3d

square. B The king at his knight's 4th square. 53. W The pawn one move.

B The king at the white king's knight's 4th square. 54. W The pawn advances. B The rook takes the pawn, and playing after

ward his king upon the rook, it is a drawn
game, because his pawn will cost your rook.

FIRST BACK GAME.
From the third move of the Queen's Gambit.
3. W The king's pawn one move.

B The king's bishop's pawn two steps. a
4. W The king's bishop takes the pawn.

B The king's pawn one move.
5. W The king's bishop's pawn one move.
B The king's knight at his bishop's 3d square. 6
6. W The queen's knight at his bishop's 3d square.

B The queen's bishop's pawn two steps. C
7. W The king's knight at his king's 2d square.

B The queen's knight at his bishop's 3d square.
8. W The king castles.
B The king's knight's pawn two steps. d
9. W The queen's pawn takes the pawn. e

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a Moving this pawn must convince you that it had been better to push your king's pawn two steps, because his pawn obstructs the union of your king's and queen's pawns in front.

b He plays his knight to hinder your king's and queen's pawns from uniting.

c This is pushed with the game design.

d He plays this pawn to push that of his king's bishop upon your king's pawn in case of need, which would produce an entire separation of your best pawns.

e If you had advanced your own instead of taking this pawn, the adversary would then have attacked your king's bishop with his queen's knight, forcing you to

23. W BT

BT 25.

BT 26. V

B 27. V

B The queen takes the queen. 10. W The rook retakes the queen.

B The king's bishop takes the pawn. 11. W The king's knight at his queen's 4th square.

B The king at his 20 square. 12. W The queen's knight at his rook's 4th square.

B The king's bishop at his queen's 3d square. 13. W The king's knight takes the knight.

B The pawn retakes the knight. 14. W The king's bishop's pawn one step. f

B The king's rook's pawu one step. 15. W The queen’s bishop at his queen's 2d square.

B The knight at his queen's 4in square. 16. W The king's knight's pawn one step.

B The queen's bishop at his queen's 2d square. 17. W The king at nis bishop's 2d square.

B. The queen's bishop's pawn one move. 18. W The knight ar his queen's bishop's 3d square.

B The queen's bishop at his 3d square. 19. W The knight takes the knight.

B. The pawn retakes ihe knight. 20. W The king's bishop at his king's 2d square.

B The queen’s rook at its king's knight's square' 21. W The queen's bishop at his 3d square.

B The king's knight's pawn takes the pawn. 22. W The bishop takes the rook. 8

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give him check ; and in this case, he, playing bis king at his bishop's second square, had gained the move upon you, and a very good situation.

f You start this pawn to prevent vour adversary from putting three pawns in front, which would have been done by pushing only bis king's pawn.

g If his pawn bad been retaken with your knight's pawn, he would have pushed his queen's pawn upon your bishop, and afterward would have entered your game with a check of his rook, supported by his queen's bishop; and if

you had taken this pawo with your king's pawn, he might have done tbe same; which would have given him a verv good game, because one of his pawns being then passed, (i. e.) a pawn that can be no more stopped but by pieces, will inevitably cost a piece, to hinder the making of a queen.

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B The pawn takes the king's pawn giving check. 23. W. The king retakes the pawn.

B The rook takes the bishop. 24. W The king's bishop at his 3d square.

B The king at his 3d square.
25. W The king's rook at its queen's second square.

B The queen's pawn gives check.
26. W The king at his bishop's 2d square.

B The queen's bishop at the white king's 4th square. 1 27. W. The queen's rook at its king's square.

B. The king at his queen's 4th square.
28. W The king's rook at its king's 2d square.

B The rook at its king's square.
29. W The king's knight's pawn one move.

B The bishop takes the bishop.
30. W The rook takes the rook.

B The pawn takes the pawn.
31. W The king's rook's pawn one move.

B The queen’s bishop's pawn one move.
32. W The king's rook at the black king's rook's square.

B The queen's pawn one move.
33. W The king at his 3d square.
B The king's bishop gives check at his queen's bish-

op's 4th square.
34. W The king at his bishop's 4th square, having no

other place.
B The queen's pawn one move, and wins the game. h

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SECOND BACK GAME,

From the third move of the queen's gambit.

3. W The king's pawn two steps.
B The queen's knight's pawn two steps.

h By this game is seen the strength of two bishops against the rooks, especially when the king is placed between two pawns

But if, instead of employing your rooks to wage war against his pawns, you had on the thirty-first move played your rook at the black queen's square; on the thirty-second move brought your other rook at your adversary's king's sec ad square; and on the thirty. third move sacrificed your first rook for his king's bishop ; you had effected a drawn game.

4. W The queen's rook's pawn two steps.

B. The queen's bishop's pawn one step. 5. W The queen's knight's pawn one step. B The gambit's pawn takes the pawn. a 6. W The rook's pawn takes the pawn. B The queen's bishop's pawn takes the pawn. 7. W The king's bishop takes the pawn, and gives

check B The bishop covers the check. 8. W The queen takes the pawn.

B The bishop takes the bishop: 9. W The queen retakes the bishop, and gives check

B The queen covers the check. 10. W The queen takes the queen.

B The knight retakes the queen. 11. W The king's bishop's pawn two steps.

B. The king's pawn one move or step. 12. W The king at his 2d square.

B The king's bishop's pawn two steps. 6 13. W The king's pawn one move.

B The king's knight at his king's 2d square. 14. W The queen's knight at his bishop's 3d square.

B The king's knight at his queen's 4th square. C

a It is of the same consequence in the attack of the queen's gambit, to separate the adversary's pawns on that side, as it is in the king's gambit to separate them on the king's side.

6 By pushing this pawn two steps, he means to compel you to push forward your king's pawn, in order to cause your queen's pawn, now at the head, to be left behind, and become useless. (See the remarks of the second game.) Nevertheless you must play it; but endeavour afterward with the help of your pieces, to change this your queen's pawn for his king's and thus give a free passage to your own king's pawn.

c Your adversary is forced in his present situation to propose the changing of knights, although by this move he separates his pawns; for if he had played any thing else, you would have taken his rook's pawn, by playing only your knight at the black queen's knight's fourth square.

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