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10. When you are last player, and observe that the third hand cannot put a good card on his partner's lead, provided you have no good game of your own to play, return your adversary's lead. This will give your partner the tenace in that suit, and very often forces the adversary to change suits, and consequently gains the tenace in that suit also. 11. When you have ace, king, and four small trumps, begin with a small one; because it is an equal chance that your partner has a better trump than the last player; if so, you have three rounds of trumps, if not, you cannot fetch out all the trumps. 12. When you have ace, king, knave, and three small trumps, begin with the king, and then play the ace, (except one of the adversaries refuses trumps) because the odds is in your favour that the queen falls. 13. When you have king, queen, and four small trumps, begin with a small one; because the chance is in your favour that your partner has an honour. 14. When you have king, queen, ten, and three small trumps, begin with the king: because you have a fair chance that the knave will fall in the second round, or you may wait to finesse your ten upon the return of trumps from your partner. 15. When you have queen, knave, and sour small trumps, you must begin with a small one; because the chance is in your favour that your partner has an honour. 16. When you have queen, knave, nine, and three small trumps, you must begin with the queen; because you have a fair chance that the ten falls in the second round; or you may wait to finesse the nine. 17. When you have knave, ten, and four small trumps, you must begin with a small one; because the chance is in your favour that your partner has an honour. 18. When you have knave, ten, eight, and three small trumps, you must begin with the knave, in order to prevent the nine from making a trick; and the odds is in your favour that the three honours fall in two rounds. 19. When you have six trumps of a lower denomination, begin with the lowest, unless you should have ten, nine, and eight, and an honour turns up against you; in that case, if you are to play through the honour, begin with the ten, which obliges your adversary to play his honour to his advantage, or leaves it in your partner's option whether you will pass it or not.

20. When you have an ace, king, and three small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15.

21. When you have ace, king, and knave, and two small trumps, begin with the king; which, next to a moral certainty, informs your partner that you have ace and knave remaining: then putting the lead into your partner's hand, he plays you a trump; upon which you are to finesse the knave, and no ill consequence can attend such play, unless the queen lies behind you single

22. When you have king, queen, and three small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15.

23. When you have king, queen, ten, and two small trumps, begin with the king, for the reason assigned in No. 21.

24. When you have §. knave, and three small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15. 25. When you have queen, knave, and nine, and two small trumps, begin with the queen, for the reason assigned in No. 16. 26. When you have knave, ten, and three small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15. 27. When you have knave, ten, eight, and three small trumps, begin with the knave, because in two rounds of trumps it is odds but the nine falls; or, upon the return of trumps from your partner, you may finesse the eight. 28. When you have five trumps of a lower denomination, begin with the lowest, unless you have a sequence of ten, mine, and eight; in that case begin with the highest. 29. When you have ace, king, and two small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in. No. 15. 30. When you have ace, king, and knave, and one small trump, begin with the king, for the reason assigned in No. 21. 31. When you have king, queen, and two small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15. 32. When you have king, queen, ten, and one small trump, begin with the king, and wait for the return of

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trumps from your partner, when you are to finesse your ten, in order to win the knave. 33. When you have queen, knave, mine, and one small trump, begin with the queen, in order to prevent the ten from making a trick. 34. When you have knave, ten, and two small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15. 35. When you have knave, ten, eight, and one small trump, begin with the knave, in order to prevent the nine from making a trick 36. When you have ten, nine, eight, and one small trump, begin with the ten, which leaves it in your partner's discretion whether he will pass it or not. 37. When you have ten, and three small trumps, begin with a small one.

EIGHT PARTICULAR RULES.

1. When you have ace, king, and four small trumps, with a good suit, play three rounds of trumps, otherwise you are in danger of having your strong suit trumped. 2. When you have king, queen, and four small trumps, with a good suit, trump out with the king: because, when you have the lead again, you will have three rounds of trumps. 3. When you have king, queen, ten, and three small trumps with a good suit, trump out with the king, in hopes of the knave's falling at the second round ; and do not wait to finesse the ten, lest your strong suit should be trumped. 4. When you have queen, knave, and three small trumps, with a good suit, you must trump out with a small one. 5. When you have queen, knave, nine, and two small trumps, with a good suit, trump out with the queen, in hopes that the ten will fall at the second round; and so not wait to finesse the nine, but trump out a second time, for the reason assigned in No. 3. 6. When you have knave, ten, and three small trumps, with a good suit, trump out with a small one. 7. When you have knave, ten, eight, and two small trumps, with a good suit, trump out with the knave, in hopes that the nine will fall at the second round. 8. When you have ten, nine, eight, and one small trump, with a good suit, trump out with the ten.

PARTICULAR GAMES.

Games whereby you are assured that your partner has no more of the suit played either by yourself or him; with Observations. 1. Suppose you lead from queen, ten, nine, and two small cards o any suit, the second hand puts on the knave, your partner plays the eight; in this case, you having queen, ten, and nine, it is a demonstration, if he plays well, that he can have no more of that suit. By this discovery, therefore, you may play your gaine accordingly, either by forcing him to trump that suit, if you are strong in trumps, or by playing some other suit. 2. Suppose you have king, queen, and ten of a suit, and you lead your king, your partner plays the knave, this clearly demonstrates that he has no more of that sil it. 3. Suppose you have king, queen, and several more of a suit, and you begin with the king; in some cases it is good play in your partner, when he has the ace, and only one sonall card in that suit, to win his partner's king with his ace; for suppose he is very strong in tritimps, by taking his partner's king with his ace, he trumps out, and after he has cleared the board of trumps, he returns his partner's lead; and having parted with the ace of that suit, he has made room for his partner to make that whole suit; which possibly could not have been done, if he had kept the command in his hand. 4. And supposing his partner has no other good carn in his hand beside that suit, he loses nothing by the ace's taking his king; but if it should so happen that he has a good card to bring in that suit, he gains all the tricks which he makes in that suit, by this method of play. And as your partner has taken your king with the ace, and trumps out upon it; you have reason to suppose he has one of that suit to return you : therefore do not throw away any of that suit, even to keep a king or queen guarded. Gwines both to endeavour to deceive and distress your adversaries, and to demonstrate your game to your partner.

1. Suppose I play the ace of a suit of which I have ace, king, and three small ones; the last player does not choose to trump it, having none of the suit; if I am not strong enough in trumps, I must not play out the king, but keep the command of that suit in my hand by playing a small one; which I must do in order to weaken his game. 2. If a suit is led, of which I have none, and there is a great probability that my partner has not the best of that suit, in order to deceive the adversary, I throw away my strong suit; but to clear up doubts to my partner when he has the lead, I throw away my weak suit. This method of play will generally succeed, unless with very good players; and even with them you will more frequently gain than lose by this method of play

Particular games to be played by which you run the risk of losing one trick only to gain three.

1. Suppose clubs to be trumps, a heart is played by your adversary; your partner having none of that suit, throws away a spade; you are then to judge that his hand is composed of trumps and diamonds; and suppose you win that trick, and being too weak in trumps, you dare not force him; and suppose you should have king, knave, and one small diamond, and further, suppose your [... to have queen, and five diamonds; in that case, by throwing out your king in your 'first lead, and your knave in your second, your partner and you may win five tricks in that suit; whereas if you had led a small diamond, and your partner's queen having been won with the ace, the king and knave remaining in your hand obstructs the suit; and though he may have the long trump, yet by playing the small diamond, and his long trump having been forced out of his hand, you lose by this method of play three tricks in that deal.

2. Suppose in the like case of the former, you should have queen, ten, and one small card in your partner's strong suit, (which is to be discovered by the former example,) and suppose your partner to have knave and five small cards in his strong suit; you have the lead, are to play your queen; and when you play again you are to play your ten; and suppose him to have the long trump, by this method he makes four tricks in that suit.

3. In the above examples you are supposed to have the lead, and by that means have had an opportunity of throwing out the best cards in your hand of your partner's strong suit, in order to make room for the whole

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