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proves the separation; but if he calls a wrong card, he or his partner is liable for once to have the highest or lowest card called in any suit led during that deal.

24. If any person, suipposing the game lost, throws his cards upon the table with their faces upwards, he may not take them up again, and the adverse party may call any of the cards.

25. If any person is sure of winning every trick in his hand, he may show his cards, but he is then liable to have them called.

Of omitting to play a Trick. 26. If any person omits playing to a trick, and it ap. pears he has one card more than ihe rest, it is in the option of the adversary to have a new deal.

Respecting who played a particular Card. 27. Each person, in playing, may require each person to lay his card before him, but not inquire who played any particular card.

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SHORT RULES FOR LEARNERS.
Before we enter upon the more complex points of the

game, we recommend the learner to commit the follow.
ing twenty four Rules to memory.

1. Lead froin your strong suit, and be cautious how you change suits.

2. Lead through an honour when you have a good hand.

3. Lead through the strong suit, and up to the weak, but not in trumps, unless you are very strong in them.

4. Lead a trump. if you have four, or five, or a strong hand; but not if weak.

5. Sequences are eligible leads, and begin with the highest.

6. Follow your partner's lead; but not your adversary's.

7. Do not lead from ace queen, or ace krave.
8. Do not lead an ace, unless you have the king.

9. Do not lead a thirteenth card, unless trumps are out.

10. Do not trump a thirteenth card, unless you are last player, or want the lead.

11. Play your best card third hand.

12. When you are in doubt, win the trick. 13. When you lead small trumps, begin with the highest.

14. Do not trump out, when your partner is likely to trump a suit.

15. Having only a few small trumps, make them when you can.

16. Make your tricks early, and be cautious how you finesse.

17. Never neglect to make the odd trick when in your power.

18. Never force your adversary with your best card, unless you have the next best.

19. If you have only one card of any suit, and but two or three small trumps, lead the single card.

20. Always endeavour to keep a commanding card to bring in your strong suit.

21. When your partner leads, endeavour to keep the command in his hand.

22. Always keep the card you turned up as long as you conveniently can.

23. If your antagonists are eight, and you have no honour, play your best trump.

24. Always attend to the score, and play the game accordingly.

GENERAL RULES FOR BEGINNERS. 1. When it is your lead, begin with your best suit. If you have sequence of king, queen, and knave, or queen, knave, and ten, they are sure leads, and will always gain the tenace to yourself, or partner, in other suits. Begin with the highest of a sequence, unless you have five : in that case, play the lowest (except in trumps, when you must always play the highesi,) in order that you may get the ace or king out of your partner's or adversary's band; by which means you make room for your suit.

2. When you have five small trumps, and no good cards in the other suits, trump out. It will have this good effect, to make your partner the last player, and by that means give him the tenace.

3. When you have only two small trumps, with ace and king of two other suits, and a deficiency of the fourth suit, make as many tricks as you can immedi

ately; and if your partner should refuse either of your suits, do not force him, as that may weaken his game too much.

4. It is seldom necessary for you to return your part. ner's lead immediately, if you have good suits of your own play; unless it be to endeavour to save or win a game. A good suit is when you have sequence of king, queen, and knave, or queen, knave, and ten.

5. When you are each five tricks, and you are certain of two tricks in your own hand, do not fail to win them in expectation of scoring two that deal; because if you lose the odd trick it makes a difference of two, and you play two to one against yourself. There is, however, one exception to this rule, and that is, when you see a probability of saving your lurchi, or of winning the game; in either of which cases you are to risk the odd trick.

6. If you have a probability of winning the game, always risk a trick or two: because the share of the stake which your adversary has by a new dea), will amount to more than the point or two which you risk by that deal.

7. When your adversary is six or seven love, and it is your turn to lead, in that case you ought to risk a trick or two, in hopes of putting your game upon an equality; therefore admitiing you have the queen or knave, and one other trump, and no good cards in any other suit, play out your queen or knave of trumps; by which means you strengthen your partner's game if he is strong in truinps, and if he is weak, you do him no injury.

8. When you are four of the game, you must play for an odd trick, because it saves one half of the stakes you are playing for; and, in order to win the odd trick, though you are pretty strong in trumps, be very careful how you trump out.

What is meant by being strong in trumps, is in case you have one honour and three trumps.

9. When you are nine of the game, and though strong in trumps, observe that there is a chance of your partner's trumping any of the adversary's suits, in that case do not trump out, but give him an opportunity of trumping those suits. If your game is scored, 1, 2, or 3, you inust play the reverse ; and also at 5, 6, or 7; because in these two last recited cases, you play for more than one point.

10. When you are last player, and observe that the third hand cannot put a good card on his partner's lead, provided you have no good game of your own to play, return your adversary's lead. This will give your partner the tenace in that suit, and very often forces the ad. versary to change suits, and consequently gains the tenace in that suit also.

11. When you have ace, king, and four small trumps, begin with a small one; because it is an equal chance that your partner has a better trump than the last player; if so, you have three rounds of trumps, if not, you cannot fetch out all the trumps.

12. When you have ace, king, knave, and three small trumps, begin with the king, and then play the ace, (except one of the adversaries refuses trumps) because the odds is in your favour that the queen falls.

13. When you have king, queen, and four small trumps, begin with a small one; because the chance is in your favour that your partner has an honour.

14. When you have king, queen, ten, and three small trumps, begin with the king; because you have a fair chance that the knave will fall in the second round, or you may wait to finesse your ten upon the return of trumps from your partner.

15. When you have queen, knave, and four small trumps, you must begin with a small one; because the chance is in your favour that your partner has an honour.

16. When you have queen, knave, nine, and three small trumps, you must begin with the queen ; because you have a fair chance that the ten falls in the second round; or you may wait to finesse the nine.

17. When you have knave, ten, and four small trumps, you must begin with a small one; because the chance is in your favour that your partner has an honour.

18. When you have knave, ien, eight, and three small trumps, you must begin with the knave, in order to prevent the nine from making a trick; and the odds is in your favour that the three honours fall in two rounds.

19. When you have six trumps of a lower denomina. tion, begin with the lowest, unless you should have ten, nine, and eight, and an honour turns up against you; in that case, if you are to play through the honour, be. gin with the ten, which obliges your adversary to play his honour to his advantage, or leaves it in your part. ner's option whether you will pass it or not.

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20. When you have an ace, king, and three small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15.

21. When you have ace, king, and knave, and two small trumps, begin with the king; which, next to a inoral certainty, informs your partner that you have ace. and knave remaining; then putting the lead into your partner's hand, he plays you a trump; upon which you are to finesse the knăve, and no ill consequence can attend such play, unless the queen lies behind you single.

22. When you have king, queen, and three small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15.

23. When you have king, queen, ten, and two small trumps, begin with the king, for the reason assigned in No. 21.

24. When you have queen, knave, and three small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15.

25. When you have queen, knave, and nine, and two small trumps, begin with the queen, for the reason assigned in No. 16.

26. When you have knave, ten, and three small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15.

27. When you have knave, ten, eight, and three small trumps, begin with the knave, because in two rounds of trumps it is odds but the nine falls; or, upon the return of trumps from your partner, you may finesse the eight.

28. When you have five trumps of a lower denomination, begin with the lowest, unless you have a sequence of ten, nine, and eight; in that case begin with the highest

29. When you have ace, king, and two small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in. No. 15.

30. When you have ace, king, and knave, and one small trump, begin with the king, for the reason assigned in No. 21.

31. When you have king, queen, and two small trumps, begin with a small one, for the reason assigned in No. 15.

32. When you have king, queen, ten, and one small trump, begin with the king, and wait for the return of

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