Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Page

Page

POPE.

THOMSON

The Rape of the Lrck. An Heroi-Comical The Seasons :

Poem. In Five Cantoes.

Canto i.

347) Autumn ....

........... 437

.. 348 Winter........................... 447

IV.

349 The Castle of Indolence: an Allegorical Poem.

351 In Two Cantoes.

Prologue to Mr. Addison's Tragedy of C 352 Canto I. ......................... 457

Eloisa to Abelard.....

II. ......................... 463

The Temple of Fame................... 355 Ancient and Modern Italy compared : being

The Fable of Dryope. Froin Ovid's Meta. the First Part of “Liberty," a Poem..... 469

morphoses, Book IX.....

.... 359 Grecce : being the Second Part of “ Liberty,” 472

Vertumnus and Pomona. From the same, Rome: being the Third Part of “ Liberty,477

Book IV.........

Britain : being the Fourth Part of " Liberty," 482

An Essay on Man. In Four Epistles.

The Prospect : being the Fifth Part of

Epistle I. Of the Nature and State of Man

* Liberty," .......

with respect to the Universe 361

II. Of the Nature and State of Man The Happy Man. ...........

with respect to Himself, as Song. ......

an Individual............. 363 Song ........

III. Of the Nature and State of Man Ode .............

with respect to Society..... 366 Hymn on Solitude ......

IV. Of the Nature and State of Man To the Rev. Mr. Murdoch, Rector of Strad.

with respect to Happiness... 368) dishall, in Suffolk .

Moral Essays. In Five Epistles to several

Persons.

Epistle I. Of the Knowledge and Char.

A. PHILIPS.

acters of Men.......... 372

II. Of the Characters of Women

01 To the Earl of Dorset .... ...... 500

III. On the Use of Riches...... 376||

376 A Hymn to Venus, from the Greek of Sappho 501

IV. Of the Use of Riches....... 379 A Fragment of Sappho ....... ...... ib.

V. To Mr. Addison, occasioned

by his Dialogues on Medals 381

Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot, being the Prologue

COLLINS.

to the Satires..........

.... 382

Messiah, a Sacred Eclogue, in imitation of

Ode to Pity .........................

502

Virgil's Pollio.......

Ode to Fear. .........................

Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady

Ode, written in the year 1746..........

Satire........

Ode to a Lady, on the Death of Col. Charles

........ ib

Epistle to Robert Earl of Oxford and Earl

Ross, in the Action at Fontenoy .......

Mortimer ....

Ode to Evening....................

.............. 388

Ode to Liberty....................

505

The Passions, an Ode for Music......

SWIFT.

Dirge in Cymbeline..........

507

An Ode on the popular Superstitions of the

Cadenus and Vanessa.............

390 | Highlands of Scotland; considered as the

Stella's Birth-Day....................

397) Subject of Poetry.........

The Journal of a Modern Lady, in a Letter Ode on the Death of Mr. Thomson ........ 509

to a Person of Quality.......

ib.

On the Death of Dr. Swift............... 399)

Baucis and Philemon. On the ever-lamented

DYER.

loss of the two Yew-trees in the Parish of

Chilthorne, Somerset. Imitated from the Grongar Hill.....

...... 511

Eighth Book of Ovid....

... 403 The Ruins of Rome.....

...... 512

A Description of the Morning...

The Grand Question Debated: Whether Ham.

ilton's Bawn should be turned into a Bar.

SHENSTONE.

rack or a Malt-house.................. ib.

On Poetry: a Rhapsody................. 406 The School-Mistress. In Imitation of Spenser 517

A Description of a City-Shower, in imitation Elegy, describing the sorrow of an ingenuous

of Virgil's Georgics .................. 410 mind, on the melancholy event of a licen-

Horace, Book III. Ode II. To the Earl of 1 tious amour.....

Oxford, late Lord Treasurer. Sent to him A Pastoral Ballad. In Four Parts.

when in the Tower................... 411 Part 1. Absence. ....................

Mrs. Harris's Petition .................

. ib.

ib.

II. Hope .......

ib.

To the Earl of Peterborow, who commanded

III. Solicitude. ....................

the British Forces in Spain. ........... 412

... 412 IV. Disappointment .............

The Progress of Poetry ................ ib. The Dying

...... ib./ The Dying Kid....................... 523

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

......... 520

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]

Page

CHURCHILL.

LITTELTON.

The Rosciad..

. 524 The Progress of Love. In Four Eclogues.

| Eclogue I. Uncertainty. ....

II. Hope. .....

YOUNG

III. Jealousy ................

IV. Possession. ..

A Paraphrase on Part of the Book of Job... 533 To the Rev. Dr. Ayscough, at Oxford...... ib.

The Complaint: or, Night-Thoughts.

Song.......

Night the First: on Life, Death, and Im-

Song......

mortality ........

537|Song ......

Night the Second: on Time, Death, and To the Memory of the first Lady Littelton.

Friendship ........................

.... 540 A Monody ......

Night the Third: Narcissa............ 545

Night the Fourth : the Christian Triumph 549|

GOLDSMITH.

Night the Fifth: the Relapse .......... 555

Night the Sixth : the Infidel Reclaimed. In

69 The Traveller : or, a Prospect of Society...

Two Parts. Part I.

......... 563

The Deserted Village....

Night the Seventh : the Infidel Reclaimed.

The Hermit. A Ballad.........
Part II. ........................ Retaliation. A Poem.....
Night the Eighth : Virtue's Apology; or,

Stanzas on Woman. From the Vicar of Wake-

the Man of the World answered...... 582

field........

Night the Ninth and Last: the Consola.

tion ........................... 5921 Song ..........

Love of Fame, the Universal Passion. In

JOHNSON,

Seven Characteristical Satires.

Satire I. ........................

.... 610

1. 612 London: a Poem. In imitation of the Third

III. ..

..614 Satire of Juvenal.. .................. 686

616 The Vanity of Human Wishes. In imitation

IV. .. .................

: 6181 of the Tenth Satire of Juvenal..........
VI. ........................ 623

· 623 Prologue, spoken by Mr. Garrick, at the open.

VII. ..

.. 627/ ing of the Theatre-Royal, Drury-lane, 1747, 691

On the Death of Mr. Robert Levet, a Practiser

in Physic .......

AKENSIDE.

ARMSTRONG.

The Pleasures of Imagination. A Poem, in

Three Books.

The Art of preserving Health. In four Books.

Book I. ........cccccccc

Book I. Air ...

II. ..

II. Diet..................

III. ............

III. Exercise ........

... 700

Ode to the Right Honorable Francis Earl of

IV. The Passions .........

..... 704

Huntingdon ........
Hymn to the Naiads. ........
Ode to the Right Rev. Benjamin, Lord Bishop

J. WARTON.

of Winchester .......................

Ode to Fancy......

Verses, written at Montauban in France.... 711

GRAY.

T. WARTON.

Hymn to Adversity..................... 653

Elegy written in a Country Church Yard...

1b. Ode to the First of April........

The Progress of Poesy. A Pindaric Ode..

6. Ode. The Crusade....

Ode on the Spring...................... Ooo The Progress of Discontent...

Ode for Music.........

609 Inscription in a Hermitage, at Ansley Hall,

Ode on the Death of a favorite Cat, drowned

oral in Warwickshire .....

in a Tub of Gold Fishes...............

Ode. The Hamlet .......

716

Ode on a distant Prospect of Eton College..

Ode sent to a friend, on his leaving a favorite
The Bard. A Pindaric Ode...

Village in Hampshire .

The Fatal Sisters. An Ode.............. 660 The Pleasures of Melancholy

001 The Pleasures of Melancholy ........... 717

The Descent of Odin. An Ode........... 661

The Triumphs of Owen. A Fragment....

MASON.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

SMOLLETT.

Ode to Memory.........

Ode to Independency........

The Tears of Scotland....... ....... 663 Elegy on the Death of a Lady.........
Ode to Leven-Water...

.. ib. Epitaph on Mrs. Mason, in the Cathedral
Ode to Independence.................... 664) Bristol. ...........

BENJAMIN JONSON.

BENJAMIN JONSON, (or Johnson.) a poet, who, Igives a particular examination of his "Silent Wo. during life, attained a distinguished character, was man," as a model of perfection. He afterwards the posthumous son of a clergyman in Westminster, however, seems to make large deductions from this where he was born in 1574, about a month after his commendation. “You seldom (says Dryden) find father's decease. His family was originally from him making love in any of his scenes, or endeavorScotland, whence his grandfather removed to Car-ing to move the passions ; his genius was too sullen lisle, in the reign of Henry VIII.

and saturnine to do it gracefully. Humor was his Benjamin received his education under the learned proper sphere; and in that he delighted most to Camden, at Westminster school; and had made represent mechanics." Besides his comedies, Jonson extraordinary progress in his studies, when his mo- composed two tragedies, Sejanus and Catiline, both ther, who had married a bricklayer for her second formed upon ancient models, and full of transhusband, took him away to work under his step-lations; and neither of them successful. His drafather. From this humble employment he escaped, matic compositions, however, do not come within by enlisting as a soldier in the army, then serving in the scope of the present publication. the Netherlands against the Spaniards. An exploit In 1616, he published a folio volume of his works, which he here performed, of killing an enemy in which procured for him a grant from his majesty of single combat, gave him room to boast ever afier of the salary of poet-laureate for life, though he did not a degree of courage which has not often been found take possession of the post till three years after. in alliance with poetical distinction.

With high intellectual endowments, he had many On his return, Jonson entered himself at St. unamiable traits in his character, having a high deJohn's College, Cambridge, which he was shortly gree of pride and self-conceit, with a disposition to obliged to quit from the scanty state of his finances. abuse and disparage every one who incurred his He then turned his thoughts to the stage, and jealousy or displeasure. Jonson was reduced applied for employment at the theatres; but his to necessitous circumstances in the latter part of talents, as an actor, could only procure for him his life, though he obtained from Charles I. an adadmission at an obscure playhouse in the suburbs. vance of his salary as laureate. He died in 1637, at Here he had the misfortune to kill a fellow-actor the age of 63, being at that time considered as at the in a duel, for which he was thrown into prison. head of English poetry. He was interred in WestThe state of mind to which he was here brought, minster Abbey, where an inscription was placed over gave the advantage to a Popish priest in converting his grave, familiarly expressive of the reputation him to the Catholic faith, under which religion he he had acquired among his countrymen: it was, continued for twelve years.

“O rare Ben Jonson." Six months after his death, After his liberation from prison, he married, and a collection of poems to his honor, by a number applied in earnest to writing for the stage, in which of the most eminent writers and scholars in the na. he appears to have already made several attempts. tion, was published, with the title of “Jonsonius His comedy of "Every Man in his Humor," the Virbius; or the memory of Ben Jonson, revived by first of his acknowledged pieces, was performed with the Friends of the Muses." applause in 1596; and henceforth he continued to Although, as a general poet, Jonson for the most furnish a play yearly, till his time was occupied by part merits the character of harsh, frigid, and tedious; the composition of the masques and other enter- there are, however, some strains in which he appears tainments, by which the accession of James was with singular elegance, and may be placed in com. celebrated. Dryden, in his Essay on Dramatic petition with some of the most favored writers of Poetry, speaks of him as the “most learned and that class. judicious writer which any theatre ever had," and

« ZurückWeiter »