Methodism and the Southern Mind, 1770-1810

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Oxford University Press, 24.09.1998 - 264 Seiten
This book looks at the role of Methodism in the Revolutionary and early national South. When the Methodists first arrived in the South, Lyerly argues, they were critics of the social order. By advocating values traditionally deemed "feminine," treating white women and African Americans with considerable equality, and preaching against wealth and slavery, Methodism challenged Southern secular mores. For this reason, Methodism evoked sustained opposition, especially from elite white men. Lyerly analyzes the public denunciations, domestic assaults on Methodist women and children, and mob violence against black Methodists. These attacks, Lyerly argues, served to bind Methodists more closely to one another; they were sustained by the belief that suffering was salutary and that persecution was a mark of true faith.
 

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Inhalt

When Worlds Collide
3
Revolutions Civil and Religious Methodist Beginnings in America
11
The Marrow of the Methodist Self Doctrines Values and Practices
27
Slaves and Free Blacks in the Church
47
The Poverty of Riches Methodists and Class
73
Mothers in Israel White Women in the Church
94
Slavery Racism and the MasterSlave Relationship
119
Turning the World Upside Down The Stakes of the Conflict
146
Epilogue
176
Appendix
187
Notes
189
Selected Bibliography
225
Index
239
Urheberrecht

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