The Medical and Physical Journal: Containing the Earliest Information on Subjects of Medicine, Surgery, Pharmacy, Chemistry, and Natural History ..., Band 15

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R. Phillips, 1806

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Seite 166 - For rising merit will buoy up at last. Might he return, and bless once more our eyes, New...
Seite 351 - ... proportions his belief to the evidence. In such conclusions as are founded on an infallible experience, he expects the event with the last degree of assurance, and regards his past experience as a full proof of the future existence of that event. In other cases he proceeds with more caution: He weighs the opposite experiments: He considers which side is supported by the greater number of experiments : To that side he inclines with doubt and hesitation; and when at last he fixes his judgment,...
Seite 351 - A wise man, therefore, proportions his belief to the evidence. In such conclusions as are founded on an infallible experience, he expects the event with the last degree of assurance, and regards his past experience as a full proof 'of the future existence of that event.
Seite 351 - ... probability." All probability, then, supposes an opposition of experiments and observations where the one side is found to overbalance the other and to produce a degree of evidence proportioned to the superiority. A hundred instances or experiments on one side, and fifty on another, afford a doubtful expectation of any event, though a hundred uniform experiments, with only one that is contradictory, reasonably beget a pretty strong degree of assurance.
Seite 182 - Observations on the Utility and Administration of Purgative Medicines in several Diseases.
Seite 471 - ... secured by a gradual contraction which it undergoes, and by an effusion of lymph between its tunics, and into the cellular membrane surrounding it, in consequence of which these parts become thickened, and so completely incorporated with each other, that it is impossible to distinguish one from the other ; thus not only is the canal of the artery obliterated, but its extremity also is completely effaced, and blended with the surrounding parts...
Seite 73 - It then descended obliquely into the thorax, fracturing the second and third ribs ; and after penetrating the left lobe of the lungs, and dividing in its passage a large branch of the pulmonary artery it entered the left side of the spine between the sixth and seventh...
Seite 288 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Seite 166 - It draws up vapours which obscure its rays ; But ev'n those clouds at last adorn its way. Reflect new glories, and augment the day. Be thou the first true merit to befriend ; His praise is lost, who stays, till all commend.
Seite 109 - That, although it is difficult to determine precisely the number of exceptions to the practice, the medical council are fully convinced, that the failure of vaccination, as a preventive of the smallpox, is a very rare occurrence. XV. " That of the immense number who have been vaccinated in the army and navy, in different parts of the united kingdom, and in every quarter of the globe, scarcely any instances of such failure have been reported to the committee, but those which are said to have occurred...

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