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Arch. Zeit. — Archäologische Zeitung. Millin. – A. L. Millin, Gallerie mytholoBerlin.

gique. Paris, 1811. Baum. — Baumeister, Denkmäler des Müller. – Denkmäler der Alten Kunst, Klassischen Alterthums. Munich.

C. O. Müller. Göttingen, 1832. H. & P. - Herculanum et Pompei, par Roscher.— Roscher's Ausführliches LexH. Roux Ainé. Paris, 1840.

icon der griechischen und römischen

Mythologie. Leipsic. Fig.

1. Jupiter. [Wall painting.] ........... H. & P. 2. Jupiter destroying the Giants. [Gem.] : ....... Baum. 3. A Faun with grafting implements. [Gem.] ... Pine's Virgil. 4. Neptune. [Relief.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Müller. 5. Nereid on a sea-monster. [Wall painting.] ..... . Müller. 6. Prometheus. [Relief.] ....... Arch. Zeit. 7. Apollo. [Statue.] ............. Millin. 8. Lucifer, Aurora, and the Sun rising from the ocean. (Vase.)

Gerhard, Akademische Abhandlungen. 9. Atlas. [Statue.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Müller. 10. Europa on the Bull. [Vase.] ........... Baum. II. Cadmus. slaying the Dragon. [Vase.] . . . . . . . . Millin. 12. Diana. [Statue.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . · Baum. 13. Actæon torn by his hounds. [Relief.]. . . . . . . . Baum. 14. A Fury. (Vase.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roscher. 15. Tantalus, Ixion, and Sisyphus. [Relief.]

Pietro Sante Bartoli, Gli Antichi Sepolcri. 16. Medusa. [Relief.]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Müller. 17. Ammon. [Coin.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Millin. 18. Perseus and Andromeda. [Relief.] . . . . . . . . . Millin. 19. Mercury. [Wall painting.] : ........... Baum. 20. Perseus with the Gorgon's Head. (Vase.]

Gerhard, Herakles der Satyr und Dreifussräuber. Fig. 21. Minerva. [Stafue.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Müller. 22. Ceres. [Wall painting.] · · · · · · · · · · · · H. & P. 23. Cupid. [Statue.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Müller. 24. The rape of Proserpina by Pluto. [Relief.] . . . . . . Baum. 25. Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . From a Photograph. 26. Sirens. [Engraved relief.]

Mittheilungen des K. deutschen archäologischen Instituts, Athens. 27. Return of Proserpina. [Vase.] . . . . . . . . . . Baum. 28. Head of Arethusa. [Coin.] · · · · · · · · · Baum. 29. Departure of Triptolemus. [Vase.] . . . . . . . . . Baum. 20. Woman spinning. [Relief.] · · · · Smith, Dict. of Antiquities. 21. Penelope at her loom. [Vase.] · · · · · · · · · · Baum. 22. Minerva's strife with Neptune. [Vase.]. . . . . . . . Baum. 33. Pygmies fighting with Cranes. [Gem.]

0. Jahn, Archäologische Beiträge. 34. Niobe. [Statue.] · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Müller. 35. Scylla. [Coin.] · · · · · · · · · · · · ... · Müller. 36. Hecate. [Statue.] · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Müller. 37. Jason at Colchis. [Relief.] · · · · · · · · · · · Baum. 38. Bacchanal. [Marble Vase.]. . . . . . . . . . . IVaelcken. 39. Medea making the Ram young. [Vase.] . . . . . . . Baum. 40. Theseus and the dead Minotaur. [Wall painting.]. . . H. & P 41. Bacchus finding Ariadne asleep. [Wall painting.] . . . . Müller. 42. Fistula and Flute. (Relief.] . . . . . . . . . . . Baum. 43. Dædalus making wings, while Icarus helps him. [Relief.] Roscher. 14. Icarus lying dead on the shore. [Wall painting.] . . . H. 6 P. 45. The Calydonian Hunt. [Relief.] · · · · · · . . . . Baum. 46. Hercules and Cerberus. (Vase.] . . . . . . . . M:12. 12. The Apotheosis of Hercules. [Vase.] . . . . . . . . Baum. 48. Mercury conducting a soul to Charon. [Terra-cotta relief.] Arch Zeit 49. Ganymede. [Statue.] · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Millin. 50. Genius with Thyrsus and basket..i

Thompson's Horace. 51. Bacchic procession. [Vase.] · · · · · ·... Arch. Zeit. 52. Large crater, over which two youthful Satyrs are picking grapes.

[Relief.] . . . . . . . · · · · · · · · · · Millin. 53. Silenus. [Statue.]. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Müller. 54. God of Sleep. (Relief.] . · · · · · · · · · · · · Baum. 55. Sacrifice of Iphigenia. [Wall painting.] . . . . . . . Baum. 56. Galatea and Polyphemus, with two Nereids and a God of Love. (Wall

painting. ] . . . . . . · · · · · · · · · · Roscher.

[graphic]

FIG.

57. Young River-god. (Bronze head.] ......... Baum. 58. Æsculapius. [Statue.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . Müller. 59. Woman decorating a Hermes with a fillet. [Relief.]

Lützow, Münchener Antiken. 60. The Serpent Æsculapius landing on the Island. [Coin.] · Müller. 61. Boreas. [Relief.] ............... Millin.

INTRODUCTION

TO

THE “METAMORPHOSES” OF OVID.

THE Mythology of the Greeks, adopted by the Romans, consists mainly of two distinct parts. The first is what is technically called Theogony, “the generation of the gods,” and was put in the shape best known to us by Hesiod, some time about 800 (B.C. It began, there is no reason to doubt, with rude personifications of the objects and forces of nature, such as would be natural to a people of active intelligence, lively imagination, and childlike ignorance on all matters of science. The Sun, the Dawn, the Winds, the Floods, are easily conceived as superhuman persons. Some of the earlier fables are hardly any thing more than metaphors, or poetic images, put in the form of narrative. That the Sun is figured as a shepherd, and the fleecy clouds his flock, which are scattered by the wind and gathered again by his beams, - a very old bit of Eastern poetry, — easily gives rise to the stories of Apollo as the shepherd of Admetus, and that which tells the stealing of his cattle by the rogue Hermes. That the maiden Artemis gazes with love on the sleeping prince Endymion, is hardly more than a poetical way of describing the beautiful spectacle of a full moon rising opposite the sun that is going down.

But few fables can be explained in this simple way. By a very natural process, a group of divine or ideal Persons was conceived, whose family history or personal adventures became the subject of tales sometimes absolutely devoid of any sym

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