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A second case. A and B are partners against C and D: twe.ve trumps are played out, and seven cards only remain in each band, of which A has the last trump, and likewise the ace, king, and four small cards of a suit; quere, whether A should play the ace and king of that suit, or a small one? A should play a small card of that suit, as it is an equal bet his partner has a better card of that suit than the last player, and, in this case, if four cards of the suit are in either of the adversaries' hands, by this manner of playing he will be enabled to make five tricks in that suit. Should neither of the adversaries have more than three cards in that suit, it is an equal chance that he wins six tricks in it.

If A and B are partners against C and D, and eight hai trumps have been played out, and A has four trumps reby maining, C having the best trump, and is to lead, should G C play his truinp or not? No: because as he leaves

three trumps in A's hand, if A's partner has any capital suit to make, by C's keeping the trump in his hand, he can prevent his making inat suit.

A case of curiosity. Supposing three hands of cards, containing three Fu cards in each band, let A name the trump, and let B

choose which hand he pleases, A having the choice of either of the other two hands, will win two tricks. Clubs are trumps; first hand, ace, king, and six of hearts ; second hand, queen and ten of hearts, with ten of trumps ; third hand, nine of hearts, with two and three of trumps; the first hand wins of the second, the second wins of

the third, and the third wins of the last. The Calculations, which direct with moral certainty how to

play any hand at Whist, by showing the chances of youir partner's holding certain winning cards.

1. It is about five to four that your partner holds one card out of any two.

2. So it is five to two that he holds one card out of three.

3. It is about four to one that he holds one card out of any four.

4. It is two to one that he does not hold a certain card.

5. It is about three to one that he does not hold two cards out of any three.

6. It is about three to two that he does not hold two cards out of any four.

B

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Computations for laying Wagers. The odds of the game calculated with the dea' The odds in favour of the deal at starting are 21 to 20 I love

11 to 10 2 love

5 to 4 3 love

3 to 2 4 love

7 to 4 5 love is 2 to 1 of the game, and one of the lurch

2 to 1 6 love

5 to 2 7 love

7 to 2 8 love

5 to 1 9 love not quite 5 to 1, but about

9 to 2

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8 to 7 is above

3 to 2 9 to 7 is about

12 to 8 9 to 8, or rather 8 to 9, is about three and a half

in the hundred in favour of 8 with the
deal: against the deal, the odds are still,

though sinall, in favour of 8.
The odds of the game, calculated for betting through

the whole rubber, with the deal.
If the first game of a rubber is won, with 9 love

of the second, on the same side, the odds
of the rubber are nearly

13 to 1 Ditto, the first game, and 8 love of the second, are rather inore than

- 13 to 1 Ditto, and 7 love of the second, nearly

8 to 2 Ditto, and 6 love of the second, about

6 to 1 Ditto, and 4 love of the second, about

5 to 1 Ditto, and 3 love of the second, about

9 to 2 Ditto, and 2 love of the second, about

4 to 1 Ditto, and I love of the second, about

7 to 2 The odds of the game, calculated for betting through

the whole rubber, against the deal. With the first game, and 9 love of the second, about

11 to 1 * Ditto, and 8 love of the second, rather more than 11 to 1 § Ditto, and 7 love of the second

9 to 1 ! Ditto, and 6 love of the second

7 to 1 1 Ditto, and 5 love of the second

5 to 1 Ditto, and 4 love of the second

9 to 2 5 Ditto, and 3 love of the second

4 to 1 Ditto, and 2 love of the second

7 to 2 | Ditto, and I love of the second, nearly 13 to 4

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MR. PAINE'S MAXIMS FOR WHIST.

Leader. 1. Begin

with the suit of which you have most ia number. For when the trumps are out, you will proba. bly make several tricks in it.

2. If you hold equal numbers in different suits, begia with the strongest. Because it is the least liable to injure your partner.

3. Sequences are always eligible leads. Because they support your partner's hand, without injuring your own.

4. Lead from a king or queen rather than from an ace. For since the adversaries will lead from those suits which you do not, your ace will do thein most barm.

5. Lead from a king rather than from a queen, and from a queen rather than a knave. For the stronger the suit, the less is your partner endangered.

6. Lead not from ace queen, or ace knave, till it becomes necessary. For if that suit is led by the adver. saries, you have a good chance of making two tricks in it.

7. In all sequences to a queen, knave, or ten, begin with the highest. Because it will frequently distress your left hand adversary.

8. Having ace, king, and knave, lead the king. For if strong in trumps. you may wait the return of that suit and finesse the knave.

9. Having ace king, and one small card, lead the small one. For by this lead your partner has a chance to make the knave.

10. Having ace, king, and two or three small cards, play ace and king, if weak in trumps, but a small card if strong in them

For when strong in trumps you may give your partner the choice of making the first trick.

11. Having king, queen, and one small card, play the sinall one. For your partner has an equal chance to win the trick, and you need not fear to make king or queen.

12. Having king, queen, and two or three small cards, lead a small card if strong in trumps, and the king, if weak in thein. For strength in trumps entitles you to play a backward game, and to give your partner the chance of winning the first trick; but if weak in trumps, it is necessary to secure a trick in that suit, by leading the king or queen.

13. Having an ace with four small cards, and no other good suit, play a small card, if strong in trumps, and the ace if weak. For strength in trumps mav enable you to make one or two of the small cards, although your partner should not be able to support the lead.

14. Having king, kvave, and ten, lead the ten. For if your partner holds the ace, you have a good chance of making three tricks, whether he passes the ten or not.

15. Having king. queen, and ten, lead the king For if it falls upon the return of that suit from your partner, by putting on the ten, you have the chance of making two tricks.

16. Having queen, knave, and nine, lead the queen. For upon the return of that suit from your partner, but putting on the nine you will probably make the knave.

Second Hand. 1. Having ace, king, and small ones. play a small card if strong in trumps, but the king if weak in them. For otherwise your ace or king might be trumped in the latter case, and no hazard should be run with few trumps but in critical cases. 2. Having aoe, queen, and small cards, play a sinal!

For upon the return of that suit you will probably make two tricks.

3. Having ace, knave, and small cards, play a small one. For upon the return of that suit you will probably make two tricks.

4. Having ace, ten, or nine, with small cards, play a small one. For by this method you have a chance of making two tricks in the suit.

5. Having king, queen, ten, and small cards, play the queen. For hy playing the ten upon the return of the suit, you will probably make two tricks in it.

6. Having king, queen, and small cards, play a small card if strong in trumps, but the queen if weak in them. For strength in trumps warrants playing a backward game, and it is always advantageous to keep back your adversaries' suit.

7. If you hold a sequence to your highest card in the suit, play the lowest of it. For by this means your partner is inforined of your strength in that suit.

one.

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