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New Rules and Regulations of the Jockey Club, and

Private Decisions.

All disputes relative to racing at Newmarket shall, for the future, be determined by three Stewards of the Club, and two referees to be chosen by the parties concerned ; if there are onl two Stewards present, they are to fix on a third person in lieu of the absent Steward.

If for any sweepstakes or subscription, the first two horses shall come in so near together, that the judge shall not be able to decide which won, those horses shall run for such prize over again, after the last match on the same day. The other horses which started for such sweepstakes or subscription, shall be deemed losers, and entitled to their respective places, as if the race had been finally determined the first time.

All bets determined by one event, shall be subject to any compromise made by the principals, and paid in proportion to such compromise: but all double bets shall, for the future, (on account of the frequent disputes which have arisen) be considered as play or pay bets. But there is considered a distinction to the latter rule ; for instance, if a bet is made on two events, and the first is off by mutual consent, without any compromise, the bet is void; but if sixpence only was paid by way of compromise, then the whole amount is won or lost, as the event may happen.

Whe, any match or sweepstakes shall be made, and no particular weights specified, the horses, &c. shall carry eight stone seven pounds each; and it any weight is given, the highest weight is, by this resolution, fixed at eight stone seven pounds.

All bets depending between any two horses, either in match or sweepstakes, are null and void, if those horses become the property of one aud the same person, or his avowed confederate, subsequent to the bets being made. When any match is made, in which crossing and jostling are not mentioned, they shall be understood to be barred.

All forfeits or money paid on compromising any match, shall, bona fide, be declared and entere in tite day.book, in order that all bettors may be put i' on an equality with the person who had the match or we pe stakes, and may thus ascertain in what proportion they are to pay and receive.

In case any gentleman who keeps running horses has cause to complain of any feeder, rider, groom, boy, or other person employed by him in, or intrusted with the knowledge of trials, of having discovered them, directly or indirectly, by betting, or wilfully in any other way, (unless allowed so to do by his employer) or if any person as aforesaid, living with any gentleman, shall be discovered in watching frials himself, or procuring other persors so to do, or by any unfair means whatsoever Endeavouring to discover trials ; on such complaint being carried to any one of the Stewards, that Steward is io summon a general Jockey Club meeting as soon as convenient, which meeting is to appoint a committee of hree members, to examine into the accusation; and in case they shall be of opinion that the person or persons is or are guilty of it, then the person so found guilty shall be dismissed from the service of his employer, and the said person shall not be employed by any mem. ber of the Jockey Club, in any capacity whatever; nor shall any horse, &c. fed or rode by him or them, or in the management of which he or they are concerned, be suffered to start for Plate, Match, or Subscription. And the names of the persons found guilty of these offences shall be exposed in the Racing Calendar, and inserted in a paper to be fixed up in the coffee. room at Newmarket.

The owners of horses. fuc, engaged in Matches or Sweepstakes, in which the forfeits shall amount to one hunrired guineas, or upward, shall be entitled to a de. duction of ten per cent. if they declare their forfeits by half past pine the evening preceding running.

TABLE, Showing what Weights Horses are to carry, that run

for Give and Take Plates, from Twelve to Fifteen - Hands high.

st. Ib. oz. Troelve Hands . . . . . . . . . . 5 0 0 And for every half a quarter of an inch . . 0 0 14

0 0 And for every half a quarter of an inch . . 0 0 14

Fourteen Hands . ......... 900 2 And for every half a quarter of an inch . . 0 0 14 Fifteen Hands .......... 11 00

Thirteen Hands .

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COCKUNG.

Tais game, if it may be so called, had its rise and adoption in the earliest times among the Barbarians, Greeks, and Romans. It appears to have been a stand. ard diversion among the latter at the time they abolished the combats of the gladiators in the Arena. The islanders of Delos, it appears, were great lovers of cock. fighting Tanagra also, a city in Bæotia, the isle of Rhodes, Chalcis in Eubea, and the country of Media, were celebrated for their partiality to and their breed of chickens. It has continued a sport among the English for a long period, although now much on the decline.

Directions for breeding Game Cocks. The breeding cock should be selected from a strain which has generally, if not always, gained the odd bat. tle when equally matched; be also thoroughly convin. ced that he is quite sound, by attending to his mode of feeding, where, should he eat corn enough to make his crop very hard, and digest the same speedily, that is as sure a token his constitution is good, as that it is rotten! when he eats but little, and has besides a bad digestion. To be still more sure, try also by running him down in a field, and sparring with another cock, at either of which, if he is unsound, he will turn black in the face. Try the hens too in like manner.

The cock ought to have a long thin head, or very taper, if short; full large eves, stout crooked beak, thick long neck, short compact hody, round breast, firm stout thighs, well placed up to the sboulders, long strong legs, and if they agree in colour with the beak, it is reckoned a nerfection; broad thin feet, and very long claws; a stately walk, and an upright easy carriage, his wings not lying close on his back, but rather extended.

A cock possessed of the preceding qualifications, in condition to fight, ought not to weigh more than 4 lb. 10 Oz, for when above that weight, and the hens of a

good size, their progeny, if well walked, will be too large to fight, being beyond the articles; and if the cock is much less in weight than 4 lb. 8 oz. the chickens will not have the due share of bone requisite to contend

with cocks that are true bred. The hens should cor>> respond to the cock in feather, shape, and make, with bodies sufficiently roomny behind for the production of large eggs.

The breeding walk should be where there are out. i houses for shelter in bad weather, on a dry soil, all the 3 better if gravelly, at a distance from any house where 8 fowls are kept, lest the hens should be trod by other

cocks: and, if possible, where there is a constant rill of clear water running near the house, as all foul water, especially soap suds, causes the rcop, a fatal disease that never can be thoroughly cured.

In February, put the cock and not more than three or

four hens together, and let them be sisters, if possible, En for greater certainty in breeding. Before the hens be

gin laying, provide distinct and separate nests for them, else they will be apt to guarrel and fight, till they at last entirely spoil one another. The first egg being usually smaller than the others, mark and leave that in the nest; take out all the others the same day they are laid, write on, and put them in a box with bran. When the hens begin to grow broody, put the eggs laid by in the nest, as inost likely to produce good chickens. Plenty of food and water should always be near the sitting

hens, and if they are in a floored place, lay a quantity of o gravel upon it. Those chickens are of little value that

are hatched later than May; and those hatched before the end of March are often cramped by cold; such as are later than the beginning of June never run cocks so

weather turns out dry, and the sun shines, the chickens may be put out of doors, even the day after they are batched, confining the hens under crates.

For the first fortnight the chickens should be feil on bread and eggs mixed, besides grits; and if kept in a room, where they cannot get insects, led them have some raw bones of beef or mutton to pick, with a supe ply of fresh cuvi water. Feed them three times a day with as much as they can eat. After the hens are removed, put the brood cock along with the cock chick

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