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2. B The king's knight at his bishop's 3d square.

W The queen's pawn one move. 3. B The king's bishop at the queen's bishop's 4th

square. W The king's bishop's pawn two moves.ee 4. B The queen's pawn one move.

W The queen's bishop's pawn one move. 5. B The king's pawn takes the pawn. b

W The queen's bishop retakes the pawn. 6. B The queen's bishop at the white king's knight's

4th square. W The king's knight at his bishop's 3d square. & 7. B The queen's knight at his queen's 2d square.

W The queen's pawn one move.

a Had your adversary played any thing else, this was still your best move, it being highly advantageous to change your king's bishop's pawn for his royal pawn; because your king and queen's pawns place themselves in the middle of the chess board, and are thus enabled to stop all the progress of your adversary's pieces; be. sides this, you gain the attack by his having played bis king's knight at the second move. You have also ano. ther advantage by losing vour king's bishop's pawn for his king's pawn; viz. when you do castle with your king's rook, the same rook finds itself instantly free and fit for action. This will be made clear by the first back game, the third move.

6 Observe, if he refuses taking your pawn, leave it exposed in the same situation and place; unless he should choose to castle with his king's rook, in such case you must undoubtedly push that pawn forwards, in order to attack his king with all the pawns of your right wing. The effect will be best understood by a se. cond back game, beginning from this fifth move. Take notice again, as a general rule, not easily to push on the pawns either of your right or left vings before your ad. versary's king has castled, otherwise he will retire where your pawns are less strong or less advanced.

cf he takes your knight, you must take his with your pawn, which being joined to his increases their strength.

8. B The bishop retires.

W The king's bishop at his queen's 3d square. d 9. B The queen at her king's 2d square.

W The same. 10. B The king castles with his rook. e

W The queen's knight at his queen's 2d square. 11. B The king's knight at bis rook's 4th square. $

W The queen at her king's 3d square. 12. B The king's knight takes the bishop. g

W The queen retakes the knight. 13. B The queen's bishop takes the knight. h • W The pawn retakes the bishop.

. d This is the best square your king's bishop can choose, except the fourth of his queen's bishop, particularly when you have the attack, and it is not in your adversary's power to hinder that bishop from playing on his king's bishop's pawn.

e Had he castled on his queen's side, then it would have been your game to casile on your king's side, that you might attack him more conveniently with your pawns on the left. Be cautious in pushing your pawns forward till they are well sustained both by one another, and also by your pieces. The forın of this attack at your left will be best understood by a third back game, commencing from this tenth move.

f He plays this knight to make room for his king's bishop's pawn, in order to advance it two steps, and thus to break the chain of your pawns.

g Had he pushed his king's bishop's pawn instead of taking your bishop, in that case you must have attacked his queen with your queen's bisbop, and pushed your king's rook's pawn the next move upon his bishop, to force him to take your knight; in which case your best game is to retake his bishop with your pawn, in order to support your royal pawn, and replace it in case it be taken.

h If he did not take your knight, his bishon would remain imprisoned by your pawns, or he would lose at Jeast three moves to see him at liberty,

K2

14. B The king's bishop's pawn two moves.

W The queen at her king's knight's 3d square.. 15. B The pawn takes the pawn.

W The bishop's pawn retakes it. 16. B The king's rook at its king's bishop'is 3d

square. i W The king's rook's pawn two steps. k 17. B The queen's rook at its king's bishop's square.

W The king castles with his queen's rook. 18. B The queen's bishop's pawn two steps.

W The king's pawn one step. 2

i He plays this rook either with an intention to double it, or to renove your queen.

k You push this pawn two steps to give your queen more room, who, being attacked, can retire behind this pawn, and then remain, menacing her adversary's king's rook's pawn. Your pawn advancing afterward will become dangerous to your adversary's king.

I This move is most difficult to comprehend as well as to explain. You are to observe, when you find your. self with a chain of pawns succeeding one another upon one and the same coloured squares, the pawn who has the van must not be abandoned, but should strivo to keep his post. Here again observe, that your king's pawn being not in the line of his comrades, your adver. sary bas pushed his queen's bishop's pawn two steps, for two reasons The first, to engage you to push that of your queen forwards, which, in this case, would be always stopped by that of his queen, and thus leaving behind that of your king, would render it totally use less. The second is, to hinder your king's bishop from battering his king's rook's pawn; it is best, therefore, to push your king's pawn upon his rook, and lose it; because ihen your adversary, by taking it, opens a free passage to your queen's pawn, which you are to ad. vance immediately, and support, in case of need, with your other pawns, with a view to make a queen with it, or draw soine other valuable advantage to win the game. His queen's pawn (now become bis king's) apparently has the same advantage of having no opposition from your pawns to make a queen: the difference, however, 19. B The queen's pawn takes the pawn.

W The queen's pawn one inove. 20. B 'The bishop at his queen's wishop's 2d square.

W The knight at his king's 4th square m 21. B The king's rook at the white king's bishop's 3d

square.
W The queen at her king's knight's 2d square.
22 B The queen at her king's bishop's 2d square, in
W The knight at the black king's knight's 4th

square.
23. B The queen gives check.

W The king at his queen's knight's square.
24. B The rook takes the bishop. 0

W The rook retakes the rook. 25. B The queen at her king's bishop's 4th square.

W The queen at her king's 4th square. P

a

is great, because his pawn being entirely parted from his comrades will always be in danger in his road, by a multitude of your pieces all waging war against it.

m In order to stop his king's pawn, it becamne neces. sary to play that knight; the more, because this very pawn, in its present situation, blocks up the passage of his own bishop, and even of his knight.

a

n He plays his queen to give check next: but if he had played his king's rook's pawn to frustrate the at. tack of your knight, you must then have attacked his bishop and his queen with your queen's pawn; hence he would have been forced to take your pawn, and you should have retaken his bishop with your knight, wnich he could not have taken with his queen, because she would have been lost by a discovered check with your bishop.

o He takes your king's bishop; in the first place, to save his king's rook's pawn, and because your bishop proves more inconvenient to hirn than any other of your pieces; and secondly, to put his queen upon the rook ihat covers your king.

p Having the arvantage of a rook against a bisirop at the end of a game, it is your interest to change

26. B The queen takes the queen.

W The knight takes the queen. 27. B The rook at the white king's bishop's 4th

square: W The knight at the black king's knight's 4th

square. 28. B The queen's bishop's pawn one move. W The queen's rook at her king's knight's 3d

square. 29. B The knight at his queen's bishop's 4th square.

W The knight at the black king's 3d square. 30. B The knight takes the knight.

W The pawn retakes the knight. 31. B The rook at its king's bishop's 3d square.

W The kmg's rook at its queen's square. 32. B The rook takes the pawn. W The king's rook at the black queen's 2d square, and must win the game. 9

FIRST BACK GAME.

From the third move. 3. B The queen's pawn two steps.

W The king's bishop's pawn two steps. 4. B The queen's pawn takes the pawn, a

W The king's bishop's pawn takes the pawn. 5. B The king's knight at the white king's knight's

4th square. W The queen's pawn one step.

queens : because his queen being at present troublesome in the post where he just played it, you compel him to change, which he cavnot avoid, if he will save his being check mate.

9 Any thing he could have played could not hinder you from doubling your rooks, unless he had sacrificed his bishop, or let you make a queen with your pawn; thus he loses the game all ways.

a If he had taken your king's bishop's pawn in lieu of this, you must have pushed your king's pawn upon his knight, and his pawn you must afterward have retaken with your queen's bishop.

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