The Harvard Classics, Band 3

Cover
Charles William Eliot
P.F. Collier & son, 1909
 

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Inhalt

I
7
III
9
IV
11
V
15
VI
16
VII
17
VIII
20
IX
22
XXXV
95
XXXVI
98
XXXVII
100
XXXVIII
101
XXXIX
103
XL
104
XLI
106
XLII
110

X
23
XI
28
XII
29
XIII
33
XIV
34
XV
36
XVI
38
XVII
44
XVIII
47
XIX
48
XX
50
XXI
55
XXII
59
XXIII
60
XXIV
63
XXV
65
XXVI
66
XXVII
67
XXVIII
69
XXIX
75
XXX
85
XXXI
86
XXXII
87
XXXIII
89
XXXIV
92
XLIII
111
XLIV
112
XLV
114
XLVI
117
XLVII
123
XLVIII
125
XLIX
126
L
128
LI
129
LII
131
LIII
132
LIV
134
LV
135
LVI
137
LVII
141
LVIII
143
LIX
147
LXI
151
LXII
193
LXIII
195
LXIV
199
LXV
245
LXVI
261
LXVII
265
LXVIII
324

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 129 - Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend.
Seite 212 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
Seite 203 - Dragon's teeth; and being sown up and down, may chance to spring up armed men. And yet on the other hand, unless wariness be used, as good almost kill a man as kill a good book. Who kills a man, kills a reasonable creature. God's image ; but he who destroys a good book kills reason itself ; killfe the image of God, as it were in the eye.
Seite 20 - The best composition and temperature is to have openness in fame and opinion ; secrecy in habit; dissimulation in seasonable use; and a power to feign, if there be no remedy.
Seite 65 - And if time of course alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Seite 233 - The light which we have gained, was given us not to be ever staring on, but by it to discover onward things more remote from our knowledge.
Seite 203 - It is true, no age can restore a life whereof perhaps there is no great loss; and revolutions of ages do not oft recover the loss of a rejected truth, for the want of which whole nations fare the worse. We should be wary therefore what persecution we raise against the living labours of public men, how we spill that seasoned life of man preserved and stored up in books...
Seite 22 - He that hath wife and children, hath given hostages to fortune ; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief.
Seite 237 - ... is so sprightly up, as that it has not only wherewith to guard well its own freedom and safety, but to spare and to bestow upon the solidest and sublimest points of controversy, and new invention, it betokens us not degenerated, nor drooping to a fatal decay...
Seite 235 - Yet these are the men cried out against for schismatics and sectaries, as if, while the temple of the Lord was building, some cutting, some squaring the marble, others hewing the cedars, there should be a sort of irrational men, who could not consider there must be many schisms and many dissections made in the quarry and in the timber, ere the house of God can be built.

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