The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Band 27

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J. Limbird, 1836
Containing original essays; historical narratives, biographical memoirs, sketches of society, topographical descriptions, novels and tales, anecdotes, select extracts from new and expensive works, the spirit of the public journals, discoveries in the arts and sciences, useful domestic hints, etc. etc. etc.
 

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Seite 175 - But he her fears to cease, Sent down the meek-eyed Peace ; She, crowned with olive green, came softly sliding Down through the turning sphere, His ready harbinger, With turtle wing the amorous clouds dividing: And, waving wide her myrtle wand, She strikes a universal peace through sea and land.
Seite 24 - Twas Christmas told the merriest tale ; A Christmas gambol oft could cheer The poor man's heart through half the year.
Seite 205 - I am going fast :• — it will be all over with me soon. Come nearer to me. Let my dear Lady Hamilton have my hair, and all other things belonging to me.
Seite 29 - In this time (says the historian) the woods began to rejoice that they were no longer infested with robbers ; the oxen began to plough ; the pilgrims visited the sanctuaries ; the roads and inns were replenished with travellers ; trade, plenty, and good faith, were restored in the markets ; and a purse of gold might be exposed without danger in the midst of the highway.
Seite 399 - Neatly she dress'd, nor vainly seem'd t' expect Pity for grief, or pardon for neglect ; But when her wearied Parents sunk to sleep, She sought her place to meditate and weep : Then to her mind was all the past...
Seite 399 - twas her proper care. Here will she come, and on the grave will sit, Folding her arms, in long abstracted fit; But if observer pass, will take her round, And careless seem, for she would not be found; Then go again, and thus her hour employ, While visions please her, and while woes destroy.
Seite 341 - Froissart. The May-pole on the margin of that poetic stream completed the illusion. My fancy adorned it with wreaths of flowers, and peopled the green bank with all the dancing revelry of May-day. The mere sight of this May-pole gave a glow to my feelings and spread a charm over the country for the rest of the day; and as I traversed a part of the fair plain of Cheshire and the beautiful borders of "Wales, and looked from among swelling hills down a long green valley, through which "the Deva wound...
Seite 125 - THE HAUNCH OF VENISON. A POETICAL EPISTLE TO LORD CLARE. THANKS, my lord, for your venison, for finer or fatter Never rang'd in a forest, or smok'd in a platter ; The haunch was a picture for painters to study, The fat was so white, and the lean was so ruddy...
Seite 24 - All hailed, with uncontrolled delight And general voice, the happy night That to the cottage, as the crown, Brought tidings of salvation down. The fire, with well-dried logs supplied, Went roaring up the chimney wide ; The huge hall-table's oaken face...
Seite 274 - I had learned before the death of my father and mother. There is a hill not far from the town, called Crooksbury Hill, which rises up out of a flat in the form of a cone, and is planted with Scotch fir-trees. Here I used to take the eggs and young ones of crows and magpies. This hill was a famous object in the neighbourhood. It served as the superlative degree of height. 'As high as Crooksbury Hill,' meant with us, the utmost degree of height.

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