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State, but the Nation as a whole. Some studies are now being made, but they should be extended, and there is need of correlating all existing data in order that they may be made available to protect the mental health of the public at large and to ameliorate conditions among those already suffering from mental disorders. This work can well be done through a division such as is contemplated.

Enlarged facilities are also needed in the central bureau of the Public Health Service with which to advance rural sanitation. Studies of this subject, with special reference to typhoid fever, malaria and other diseases, are now under way, and the work is of such volume as to require an additional division for its proper conduct. Over 50 per cent of the total population of the United States is rural." Urban centers are far ahead of rural communities in measures for the protection of the public health. These latter should, therefore, be the particular object of attention of the Federal and State Governments from a public health standpoint.

The creation of the two divisions contemplated will in reality provide for rearrangement of present work and the assignment of one additional medical officer for each division to carry on the work, which officers are already in the employ of the Government. With the exception of the employment of additional necessary clerks, for which there is already authority in law, there would be little additional expense, and the enactment of the bill into law would be a further step in improving publichealth organization. I am heartily in favor of the measure, therefore, and strongly urge that bill H. R. 721 be enacted into law. Respectfully,

W. G. McAdoo, Secretary.

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PERPETUAL CARE OF HURON CEMETERY.

APRIL 1, 1916.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the

Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. STEPHENS of Texas, from the Committee on Indian Affairs,

submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 10989.)

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill H. R. 10989, being a bill making an appropriation for the preservation, improvement, and perpetual care of Huron Cemetery, a burial place of the Wyandotte Indians, in the city of Kansas City, Kans., having carefully considered the same, recommends that the bill be amended, and that as so amended the bill do pass.

Amend the bill by striking out all after the enacting clause and inserting in lieu thereof the following:

That the sum of $20,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the preservation and improvement of Huron Cemetery, a tract of land in the city of Kansas City, Kansas

, owned by the Government of the United States, the use of which was conveyed by treaty to the Wyandotte Tribe of Indians as a cemetery for the members of said tribe: Provided, That the authorities of Kansas City, Kansas, will construct and maintain all necessary retaining or outside walls along all the boundaries of said cemetery abutting on streets: And provided further, That said tract shall remain perpetually as a cemetery exclusively for the use of the Wyandotte Tribe of Indians and their descendants, and the right of burial in said cemetery for any Indian of the Wyandotte Tribe, or any descendant of said tribe, shall not be infringed. The bill as amended will read as follows:

H. R 10989, Sixty-fourth Congress, first session./ A Bil Making appropriation for the preservation, improvement, and perpetual care of Huron Ceme

tery, a burial place of the Wyandotte Indians, in the city of Kansas City, Kansas. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the sum of $20,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated

, for the preservation and improvement of Huron Cemetery, a tract of land in the city of Kansas City, Kansas, owned by the Government of the United States, the use of which was conveyed by treaty to the Wyandotte Tribe of Indians as a cemetery for the members of said tribe: Provided, That the authorities of Kansas City, Kansas, will construct and maintain all necessary retaining or outside walls along all the boun

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daries of said cemetery abutting on streets: And provided further, That said tract shall remain perpetually as a cemetery exclusively for the use of the Wyandotte Tribe of Indians and their descendants, and the right of burial in said cemetery for any Indian of the Wyandotte Tribe, or any descendant of said tribe, shall not be infringed,

The following letter of the Secretary of the Interior explains the purpose for the legislation and the favorable attitude of the Interior Department toward the same, and is hereby made a part of this report:

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, March 13, 1916. My Dear MR. STEPHENS: I am in receipt for report, by your reference of February 11, 1916, of H. R. 10989, a bill making appropriation for the preservation, improvement, and perpetual care of Huron Cemetery, a burial place of the Wyandotte Indians, in the city of Kansas City, Kans.

By article 2 of the treaty of January 31, 1855 (10 Stats., 1159–1160), the Wyandotte Nation ceded and relinquished to the United States all their right, title, and interest in and to a certain tract in the fork of the Missouri and Kansas Rivers which was pur chased by them from the Delaware Indians, but expressly excepted from said cession the lands embraced in the cemetery grounds, which by the terms of the treaty were permanently reserved and appropriated as a burial ground for the Wyandotte Indians

The act of June 21, 1906 (34 8tats., 348-349), authorized the Secretary of the Interior to sell and convey the lands embraced in the cemetery under such rules and regulations as he might prescribe, and also conferred authority for the removal of the remains of persons interred therein and their reinterment in the Wyandotte Cemetery at Quindaro, Kans. Subsequently a commission was appointed to appraise the land and to sell it to the highest bidder for cash. The commission was later dismissed without effecting a sale, and the act of June 21, 1906, supra, authorizing the sale was repealed by the act of February 13, 1913. (37 Stats., 668.)

Inasmuch as the bill under consideration proposes to improve, preserve, and perpetually care for the cemetery grounds which were set apart for the Wyandotte Indians by the treaty of 1855, I am in favor of an appropriation being made for this purpose, but suggest that the amount authorized be not more than $25,000. I am also of the opinion that the people of Kansas City should share in the expense of the improvement of the grounds, for the reason that it is located in the heart of the city and the city will naturally

be benefited if the cemetery is improved and cared for as proposed. I do not think however, that the bill should carry a continuing appropriation of $500 annually or any other sum.

I therefore suggest that the bill be amended by inserting $25,000 in lieu of $50,000 in line 3. and that all after the word "tribe" in line 10 be eliminated and in lieu thereof the following substituted:

Provided, That the authorities of Kansas City, Kan., will construct and maintain all necessary retaining or outside walls." Cordially, yours,

FRANKLIN K. LANE, Secretary. Hon. John H. STEPHENS,

Chairman Committee on Indian Afairs, House of Representatives.

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64TH CONGRESS, | HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 1st Session.

EXCHANGE OF LANDS WITH THE STATE OF NORTH

DAKOTA.

April 1, 1916.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the

Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. SINNOTT, from the Committee on the Public Lands, submitted

the following

REPORT. .

[To accompany H. R. 393.] The Committee on the Public Lands, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 393) to authorize an exchange of lands with the State of North Dakota for promotion of experiments in dry-land agriculture, and for other purposes, having had the same under consideration, beg leave to report it back to the House with the following amendments:

Amend, on page 1, line 5, by striking out the words “January twenty-sixth” and substituting in lieu thereof “February fifth.”

Amend, on page 1, line 10, by inserting, after the word "vacant,' the words "surveyed, unreserved"; and when so amended recommends that the bill do pass.

The bill as amended will read as follows: A Bill (H. R. 393) to authorize an exchange of lands with the State of North Dakota for promotion of

experiments in dry-land agriculture, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That upon receipt of a proper deed from the State of North Dakota, executed under authority of the act of its legislative assembly,

approved February fifth, nineteen hundred and fifteen, reconveying to the United States title to section sixteen, township one hundred and thirty-eight north, range eighty-one west, fifth principal meridian, the Secretary of the Interior is authorized to issue patents to said State for such vacant, surveyed, unreserved, unoccupied, nonmineral public lands as may be selected by said State within its boundaries, not exceeding one thousand two hundred and eighty acres in aggregate area, and said section when so reconveyed shall not be subject to settlement, location, entry, or selection under the public-land laws, but shall be reserved for the use of the Department of Agriculture in carrying on experiments in dry-land agriculture at the Northern Great Plains Field Station, Mandan, North Dakota.

This bill provides for an exchange of land between the State of North Dakota and the United States. Section 16, township 138 north, range 81 west, fifth principal meridian, the land' the title to which is to be reconveyed by the State of North Dakota to the United States, is located about 2 miles south of the Northern Great Plains Field

HR-64-1-vol 2-14

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