Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

On page 2 add a new section:

“Sec. 2. That there shall be excepted from the grant hereby made, any lands which at the date of the approval of this act shall be covered by a valid, existing bona fide right or claim initiated under the laws of the United States: Provided, That this exception shall not continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the claimant continues to comply with the law under which the claim or right was initiated."

This amendment is proposed in accordance with a suggestion made by the Department of the Interior in a report on the bill, which report is printed as part of this report.

The Legislative Assembly of the State of Oregon, by joint memorial, adopted at its session in 1913, memorialized Congress for the establishment of a park here.

The bill as amended will read as follows:

H. R. 10305, Sixty-third Congress, first session. A Bill To grant certain lands to the State of Oregon as a public park, for the benefit and enjoyment of

the people.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That all those certain tracts, pieces, or parcels of land lying and being situate in the State of Oregon and within the boundaries particularly described as follows, to wit: The south half and the northeast quarter of section seven, and the west half and the southeast quarter of section eight, and the southwest quarter of section nine, in township five north, range eight west of the Willamette meridian; and the southwest quarter of section twenty-seven, and the southeast quarter and west half of section twenty-eight, and the north half of section thirty-three, and the north west quarter of section thirty-four, and the northeast quarter and the southeast quarter of section twenty-nine, in township six north, range eight west of the Willamette meridian, are hereby granted to the State of Oregon as a public park or pleasuring ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people: Provided, That the patent to be issued for said lands shall contain the provision that the land shall revert to the United States whenever it shall not be used for the purposes mentioned in this act: Provided further, That the Government of the United States of America reserves the right to operate and maintain any telegraph or telephone line over and upon said land which is in operation at the passage of this act, or which it may see fit to establish thereafter.

Sec. 2. That there shall be excepted from the grant hereby made any lands which at the date of the approval of this act shall be covered by a valid, existing, bona fide right or claim initiated under the laws of the United States: Provided, That this exception shall not continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the claimant continues to comply with the law under which the claim or right was initiated.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, March 21, 1916. Hon. Scott FERRIS,

Chairman Committee on the Public Lands, House of Representatives. My Dear Mr. FERRIS: I am in receipt of your request of March 20, 1916, for a report on H. R. 10305, a bill to grant certain lands to the State of Oregon for a public park, and in response I have the honor to submit the following:

The land described in the bill contains 2,574.39 acres, of which 162.40 acres are claimed under a homestead entry, and 160 acres have been patented on a timber-andstone entry, and 1,450.03 acres are claimed as lieu selections under the act of July 1, 1898 (30 Stat., 597, 620), leaving unclaimed 801.96 acres. Except in the case of the homestead and timber-and-stone entries, action on the claims has been suspended pending said legislation.

Senate bill 7372, Sixtieth Congress, was introduced to withdraw said lands, together with other lands, for a park to be known as Saddle Mountain National Park. At that time the land was unsurveyed and embraced Humbug Mountain, in township 5, and Saddle Mountain, in township 6 N., R. 8 W. The matter has since been before Congress until the session of the Sixty-third Congress, when Senate bill 531, introduced for the purpose of creating such national park, was so amended as to constitute a grant to the State of Oregon, for park purposes, of the land embraced in the bill under consideration.

In order to protect all persons having valid claims to the land proposed to be granted to the State by the bill, I recommend that it be amended by inserting a clause to read as follows: "That there shall be excepted from the grant hereby made any lands which at the date of the approval of this act shall be covered by a valid, existing bona fide right or claim initiated under the laws of the United States: Provided, That this exception shall not continue to apply to any particular tract of land unless the claimant continues to comply with the law under which the claim or right was initiated.” When so amended I see no objection to the enactment of the proposed legislation. Cordially, yours,

ANDRIEUS A. JONES,

Acting Secretary. Q

DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HYGIENE AND RURAL

SANITATION, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.

APRIL 1, 1916.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the

Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. COADY, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com

merce, submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 721.)

The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 721) to provide divisions of mental hygiene and rural sanitation in the United States Public Health Service, having considered the same, report thereon with amendment and as so amended recommend that it pass.

The bill as amended has the approval of the Treasury Department, as will appear by the letter attached and which is made a part of this report. Amend the bill as follows:

Page 2, line 3, strike out the word “duty" and insert in lieu thereof the word "duties."

PURPOSE OF THE BILL.

The purpose of the bill is to provide two additional administrative divisions in the Bureau of the Public Health Service to meet the increasing work of the service for the general purposes specified. The performance of these duties by the service was authorized in the act of August 14, 1912.

NEED FOR ADDITIONAL DIVISIONS.

The importance of mental hygiene as a national problem is evidenced by the definite record of over 187,000 mental defectives domiciled in institutions in the United States Studies of the causes and methods for the prevention of mental disorders and the best methods for their care are obviously a function which can be performed more advantageously by the central public health authorities than by those of the separate States. Important phases of the insanity problem with which the Public Health Service is already dealing are those which pertain to the mental condition of immigrants and the occurrence of insanity among pellagrins, and this service now has a number of men trained especially for duty in the field of mental hygiene.

Over 50 per cent of the population of the United States is rural. The advancement of sanitation in rural districts in recent years has by no means kept pace with the progress in urban communities. Notwithstanding the many natural advantages of country life, from a health standpoint, certain diseases dependent upon insanitary conditions have a higher rate of prevalence in our country districts than in our cities.

Between the rural and urban communities there is a free interchange of infections. Thus rural sanitation affects the general welfare of the whole population,

The securing of adequate local health organizations for the rural districts comes more slowly and is relatively more costly than is the case for the cities. The advancement of rural sanitation now depends largely, and probably for some time will depend largely, upon the conception of the importance of and the installation of sanitary improvements by the individual citizen. Such progress depends upon public health education.

The Public Health Service has a force of men trained for and engaged in field and laboratory studies of rural sanitation. With the forces of the Public Health Service engaged in collecting data on both mental hygiene and rural sanitation, the creation of additional divisions in the central bureau to direct the work, compile, correlate, and publish the data, and so serve as clearing houses for these vitally important lines of study, appears at this time to be strongly indicated.

COST OF PROPOSED MEASURE,

The enactment of the bill will entail an increase in expenditures of about $7,400 per annum, as is shown by the following statement: 2 assistant surgeons general, at $900 when promoted from grade of surgeon.... $1,800 2 clerks, at $1,600...

3, 200 2 clerks, at $1,200.

2, 400 Total......

7, 400 TREASURY DEPARTMENT, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,

Washington, January 7, 1916. The CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE,

United States House of Representatives. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 21st ultimo inclosing copy of bill (H. R. 721) to provide divisions of mental hygiene and rural sanitation in the United States Public Health Service, and requesting the views of the department concerning this measure.

This bill is identical with bill H. R. 16637, which was introduced at the last session of the preceding Congress and acted upon favorably by the House of Representatives. Its essential object is to provide improved administrative facilities for carrying on systematic studies in mental hygiene and rural sanitation for which authority already has been given in law.

It is conservatively estimated that there are now in the United States 250,000 insane persons and 300,000 mental defectives. The influence of these abnormal states on the production of pauperism and criminality and on race development require systematic investigation to determine their causes and methods of prevention. The social, economic, and public-health problems involved affect not only each

« ZurückWeiter »