English & American Literature, Studies in Literary Criticism, Interpretation & History, Including Complete Masterpieces, in 10 Vol, Band 8

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Seite 76 - Surely he shall deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, And from the noisome pestilence. He shall cover thee with his feathers, And under his wings shalt thou trust: His truth shall be thy shield and buckler.
Seite 299 - Thus wondrous fair: thyself how wondrous then! Unspeakable ! who sitt'st above these heavens To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine. Speak, ye who best can tell, ye Sons of Light, Angels — for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing — ye in heaven; On earth join, all ye creatures, to extol Him first, him last, him midst, and without end.
Seite 77 - A thousand shall fall at thy side and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee. Only with thine eyes shalt thou behold and see the reward of the wicked.
Seite 295 - He scarce had ceased when the superior Fiend Was moving toward the shore; his ponderous shield, Ethereal temper, massy, large, and round, Behind him cast; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the moon, whose orb Through optic glass the Tuscan artist views At ev'ning from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers or mountains in her spotty globe.
Seite 291 - You haste away so soon: As yet the early-rising Sun Has not attain'd his noon. Stay, stay, Until the hasting day Has run But to the even-song; And, having pray'd together, we Will go with you along.
Seite 42 - This doctrine, my friends, is reason and wisdom; but, after all do not depend too much upon your own industry and frugality and prudence, though excellent things; for they may all be blasted, without the blessing of Heaven; and, therefore, ask that blessing humbly, and be not uncharitable to those that at present seem to want it, but comfort and help them. Remember Job suffered, and was afterward prosperous. " And now, to conclude, Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other...
Seite 33 - And again, The eye of a master will do more work than both his hands; and again, Want of care does us more damage than want of knowledge; and again, Not to oversee workmen, is to leave them your purse open. Trusting too much to others...
Seite 215 - With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies ; How silently ; and with how wan a face ! What ! may it be, that even in heavenly place That busy Archer his sharp arrows tries ? Sure, if that long-with-love-acquainted eyes Can judge of love, thou feel'st a lover's case ; I read it in thy looks ; thy languisht grace To me, that feel the like, thy state descries...
Seite 215 - Now, therein, of all sciences (I speak still of human, and according to the human conceit) is our poet the monarch. For he doth not only show the way, but giveth so sweet a prospect into the way, as will entice any man to enter into it : nay he doth, as if your journey should lie through a fair vineyard, at the very first give you a .cluster of grapes, that full of that taste you may long to pass further.
Seite 297 - Thus was this place, A happy rural seat of various view : Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm ; Others whose fruit, burnished with golden rind, Hung amiable — Hesperian fables true, If true, here only — and of delicious taste.

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