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THE

DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE

OF THE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION:

BEING

THE LETTERS OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, SILAS DEANE, JOHN ADAMS, JOHN JAY, ARTHUR LEE, WILLIAM LEE, RALPH IZARD, FRANCIS DANA, WILLIAM CARMICHAEL, HENRY LAURENS, JOHN LAURENS, M. DUMAS, AND " OTHERS, CONCERNING THE FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE

UNITED STATES DURING THE WHOLE REVOLUTION;

TOGETHER WITH

THE LETTERS IN REPLY FROM THE SECRET COMMITTEE OF CONGRESS, AND

THE SECRETARY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

ALSO,

THE ENTIRE CORRESPONDENCE OF THE FRENCH MINISTERS, GERARD AND

LUZERNE, WITH CONGRESS.

Published under the direction of the President of the United States, from the original Manuscripts

in the Department of State, conformably to a Resolution of Congress, of March 27th, 1818.

EDITED BY JARED SPARKS.

VOL. II.

NEW EDITION: WASHINGTON:
PUBLISHED BY JOHN C. RIVES.

1857.

Resolution of Congress of March 27th, 1818.

Resolution directing the Publication and Distribution of the Journal and Proceedings of

the Convention which formed the present Constitution of the United States.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Journal of the Convention which formed the present Constitution of the United States, now remaining in the office of the Secretary of State, and all Acts and Proceedings of that Convention which are in possession of the Government of the United States, be published under the direction of the President of the United States, together with the Secret Journals of the Acts and Proceedings, and the Foreign Correspondence of the Congress of the United States, from the first meeting thereof down to the date of the ratification of the definitive treaty of peace between Great Britain and the United States, in the year seventeen hundred and eighty-three, except such parts of the said Foreign Correspondence as the President of the United States may deem it improper at this time to publish. And that one thousand copies thereof be printed, of which one copy shall be furnished to each member of the present Congress; and the residue shall remain subject to the future disposition of Congress.

APPROVED, March 27th, 1818.

COMPLETE IN SIX VOLUMES.

STEREOTYPED.
Jackson Hall, Washington.

.............18

M. Dubourg to B. Franklin. Paris, September 8th, 1777......11

Requesting a letter of recommendation for M. Gerard, who wishes to settle in

America

To Richard Peters. Passy, September 12th, 1777...........12

Recommending M. Gerard.

Remarks on a loan for the United States....................12

America a safer debtor than Britain, from her general industry, frugality,

prudence, ability, and virtue.

To David Hartley, member of Parliament. Passy, October 14th,

1777.....................

The conduct of Great Britain has rendered submission impossible. Cruel

treatment of the American prisoners in England. Propositions for their

relief.

To James Lovell. Paris, December 21st, 1777..............21

Mr. Deane's recommendations of officers. Numerous and vexatious applica-

tions, with high recommendations.

To James Hutton. Passy, February 1st, 1778 ..............22

Means of reconciling America.

To David Hartley. Passy, February 12th, 1778............. 24

Alienation of America from Great Britain. Kindness and cordiality of France.

Change of Ministry necessary for conciliation. Subscriptions in England

for the relief of American prisoners. Mr. Hutton.

To David Hartley. Passy, February 26th, 1778............. 26

Lord North's conciliatory bills. Advice to the English Whigs.

To James Hutton. Passy, March 24th, 1778...............28

The Commissioners are ready to treat.

Note from William Pultney to B. Franklin. March 29th, 1778, 28

Desires an interview with Dr. Franklin.

To William Pultney. Passy, March 30th, 1778........ ....29

America cannot treat on any terms short of independence; will not treat at all

in case of a war against France.

To Dr. Bancroft. Passy, April 16th, 1778.................30

British Commissioners cannot succeed in America on their terms.

David Hartley to B. Franklin. Paris, April 23d, 1778.. ......30

Advises him to take care of his own safety.

To Count de Vergennes. Passy, April 24th, 1778...........31

Giving an account of his conversations with Mr. Hartley; of the visit of Mr.

Chapman, an agent of Lord Shelburne. The Quebec fieet.

Count de Vergennes to B. Franklin. Versailles, April 25th, 1778, 33

Policy of the English to excite divisions and distrust.

James Lovell to B. Franklin. Yorktown, June 20th, 1778.....34

Answer to a letter from Brussels. Passy, July 1st, 1778 ......34

Reply to insinuations against the faith of France. Future prospects of Amer-

ica. Acknowledgment of the independency of little consequence to America.

The King's political studies. Peace is to be obtained only on equal terms.

Ridicules the offers of rewards.

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