The Cocker: Containing Every Information to the Breeders and Amateurs of that Noble Bird, the Game Cock: to which is Added a Variety of Other Useful Information for the Instruction of Those who are Attendants on the Cock Pit

Cover
J. Croft, 1814 - 154 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 49 - ... fight for two guineas each battle, to be as equally divided as can be, and added to each pit or day's play with the main of cocks ; and it is alfo agreed, that the balance of the battle money...
Seite 50 - March) first, proceeding. upwards, to the end ; that every lighter pair may fight earlier than those that are heavier " In matching (with relation to the battles) it is a rule always in London — " That after the cocks of the main are weighed...
Seite 33 - It may be necessary to explain, to some of my readers, what is to be expected from a fair trial.
Seite 49 - ... morning, cocks, none to be less than three pounds six ounces, nor more than four pounds eight ounces, and as many of each party's cocks that come within one ounce of each other shall fight for a battle, that is, each cock ; in as equal divisions as the battles can be divided into six pits, or day's play at the cock-pit...
Seite 6 - Cockers breed inand-in without scruple. The following is Mr. Sketchley's description of a brood cock, in full health and vigour : — " A ruddy complexion, feathers close and short, not cold or dry : flesh firm and compact, full breasted, yet taper and thin behind ; full in the girth, well coupled, lofty and spiring, with a good thigh ; the beam of his leg very strong, a quick large eye, strong beak, crooked, and big at setting on.
Seite 50 - TO begin the fame by fighting the lighter pair of cocks (which fall in match) firft, proceeding upwards to the end; that every lighter pair may fight earlier than thofe that are heavier. IN matching (with relation to the battles) it is a rule always in London, That after the cocks of the main are weighed, the match-bills are compared. THAT every pair of -dead, or equal weight, are feparated, and fight...
Seite 7 - I had enjoyed an invariable production of the most complete black-rede bred by any amateur, without a single instance of deviation during that period, but on the sixteenth year I had several light Piles in one hatch ; — no change of eggs could possibly take place — or was there a shadow of doubt of interference with any other cock, but a strong recurrence to the Pile at that distant period. A well regulated account of my cocks enabled me to ascertain that there had been a Pile in the cross five...
Seite 49 - It is also further agreed, for" the cocks to fight in silver spurs, and with fair hackles, and to be subject to all the usual rules of cock-fighting as practised at the CockPit Royal, Westminster, and the profits arising from the spectators, to be equally divided between both parties, after all charges are paid that usually happen on those occasions. Witness our hands the — — — — day of 447 KEY TO A MATCH BILL. A. B'
Seite 49 - ... out of the number aforesaid, shall be entitled to the sum of guineas as odd battle money; and the sum is to be made stakes into the hands of Mr. before any cocks are pitted, in equal shares between the parties aforesaid...
Seite 19 - The brood hen for such a cock should be the Dark Partridge-coloured Hen, bright red heckled above, black beneath, clean brick breasted, and such to the posterior; black beak and legs. The Mealy Grey, which may be ranked next in value to The true Dark Grey, is originated from the Black and Mealy White, has been the produce selected from those whose feathers were nearest to the Mealy White, slightly tinged and shaded with black; they have been kept in and in, and established the Mealy Grey, and from...

Bibliografische Informationen