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general

DEPOS TED BY THE
UNITED STA ES OF AMERICA

JAN 13:42

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

A 107

A109

I. Budget MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT -

II. BUDGET STATEMENTS:

General Budget Summary

Schedules:

No. 1. Receipts

No. 2. Expenditures-

No. 3. General fund balance.

No. 4. Analysis of the public debt.

No. 5. Contingent liabilities.-

III. DETAILED COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS:

Statement No. 1. Comparative statement of receipts.

Narrative synopsis supporting revenue estimates -

IV. DETAILED COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES:

Statement No. 2. Estimates, appropriations, and expenditures -

Narrative synopsis of appropriation estimates.--.

V. DETAILED COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, AND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES:

Statement No. 3A. Receipts (trust accounts, etc.).

Statement No. 3B. Appropriations and expenditures (trust accounts, etc.).

VI. ESTIMATES OF APPROPRIATIONS IN DETAIL:

Legislative establishment.

Judicial establishment.

Executive Office and independent establishments -

Federal Loan Agency--

Federal Security Agency -

Federal Works Agency--

Veterans' Administration..

General Public Works Program.

Department of Agriculture.

Department of Commerce..

Department of the Interior.

Department of Justice-

Department of Labor..

Navy Department.

Department of State.

Treasury Department.

War Department, including Panama Canal...

VII. ANNEXED BUDGETS:

Post Office Department..

Government corporations and credit agencies -

Tennessee Valley Authority.

District of Columbia.

VIII. INFORMATIONAL TABLES:

No. 1. Estimated receipts and expenditures for the fiscal years 1943 and 1942, compared with actual receipts and expendi-

tures for 1941 on the basis of the classification appearing in the daily Treasury statement.

No. 2. Permanent appropriations included in Statement No. 2----

No. 3. Summary of estimated expenditures for public works, fiscal years 1943 and 1942, compared with actual expendi-

tures for the fiscal year 1941..

No. 4. Statement of expenditures under general heads, fiscal years 1935 to 1941, inclusive---

No. 5. Statement of balances of appropriations as of June 30, 1941 (exclusive of trust accounts), and of appropriations

for the fiscal year 1942 (including permanent and indefinite appropriations), as of November 1, 1941, reported

by the Secretary of the Treasury-

No. 6. Securities owned by the United States Government, June 30, 1941, and June 30, 1940..

No. 7. Actual and estimated receipts and expenditures of the Government for the fiscal years 1934–43..

Index.

BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

To the Congress of the United States:

I am submitting herewith the Budget of the United States for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1943. It is the budget of a nation at war in a world at war.

In practical terms the Budget meets the challenge of the Axis powers. We must provide the funds to man and equip our fighting forces. We must provide the funds for the organization of our resources. We must provide the funds to continue our role as the Arsenal of Democracy.

Powerful enemies must be outfought and outproduced. Victory depends on the courage, skill, and devotion of the men in the American, British, Russian, Chinese, and Dutch forces, and of the others who join hands with us in the fight for freedom. But victory also depends upon efforts behind the lines in the mines, in the shops, on the farms.

We cannot outfight our enemies unless, at the same time, we outproduce our enemies. It is not enough to turn out just a few more planes, a few more tanks, a few more guns, a few more ships, than can be turned out by our enemies. We must outproduce them overwhelmingly, so that there can be no question of our ability to provide a crushing superiority of equipment in any theater of the world war.

And we shall succeed. A system of free enterprise is more effective than an “order” of concentration camps. The struggle for liberty first made us a Nation. The vitality, strength, and adaptability of a social order built on freedom and individual responsibility will again triumph.

THE WAR PROGRAM

Our present war program was preceded by a defense effort which began as we emerged from the long depression. During the past 18 months we laid the foundation for a huge armament program. At the same time industry provided ample consumers' goods for a rapidly growing number of workers. Hundreds of thousands of new homes were constructed; the production of consumers' durable goods broke all records. The industrial plant and equipment of the country were overhauled and expanded.

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