The Lake-dwellings of Europe: Being the Rhind Lectures in Archaeology for 1888

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Cassell, limited, 1890 - 600 Seiten
 

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Seite 551 - Orbelus, and every man drives in three for each wife that he marries. Now the men have all many wives apiece, and this is the way in which they live. Each has his own hut, wherein he dwells, upon one of the platforms, and each has also a trap-door giving access to the lake beneath; and their wont is to tie their baby children by the foot with a string, to save them from rolling into the water. They feed their horses and their other beasts upon fish, which abound in the lake to such a degree, that...
Seite 349 - ... to admit large panels, driven down between them. The interiors of the chambers so formed were filled with bones and black moory earth, and the heap of bones was raised up, in some places, within a foot of the surface.
Seite 551 - Platforms supported upon tall piles stand in the middle of the lake, which are approached from the land by a single narrow bridge. At the first the piles which bear up the platforms were fixed in their places by the whole body of the citizens, but since that time the custom which has prevailed about fixing them is this...
Seite 474 - ... as stones and earth, would be totally inadmissible owing to their weight, so that solid logs of wood, provided there was an abundant supply at hand, would be the best and cheapest material that could be used. To construct in...
Seite 348 - The circumference of the circle was formed by upright posts of black oak, measuring from 6 to 8 feet in height ; these were mortised into beams of a similar material, laid flat upon the marl and sand beneath the bog, and nearly 16 feet below the present surface. The upright posts were held together by connecting cross-beams, and [said to be] fastened by large iron nails ; parts of a second upper tier of posts were likewise found resting on the lower ones.
Seite 551 - Aeribus &c.' xxxvii. It runs thus : — ' Concerning the people on the Phasis (now Rioni), that region is marshy and hot, and full of water, and woody ; and at every season frequent and violent rains fall there. The inhabitants live in the marshes, and have houses of timber and of reeds constructed in the midst of the waters ; and they seldom go out to the city or the market, but sail up and down in boats made out of a single tree-trunk ; for there are numerous canals in that region.
Seite 451 - Celtic short-horn ox, the so-called goat-horned sheep, and a domestic breed of pigs were largely consumed. The horse was only scantily used. The number of bones and horns of the red-deer and roebuck showed that venison was by no means a rare addition to the list of their dietary. Among birds, only the goose has been identified, but...
Seite 406 - ... would be found to terminate in some more solid basis than had yet been made apparent. To remove all doubts on this point, though a long iron rod could be easily pushed downwards without meeting any resistance, we ordered a large deep shaft to be dug in the line of the piles, and the cutting Q, being nearest the Crannog, was selected for this purpose. This was accomplished with much difficulty, but we were amply rewarded by coming upon an elaborate system of wood-work, which I found no less difficult...
Seite 460 - Bos longifron* cut through in the middle and roughly squared at the small end ; the others, which are called by the workmen spear-heads, are pointed at one end and hollowed out at the other, as if to receive a shaft. Both Professor Owen and Mr. Blake concur in thinking these implements may possibly have been formed with flint, but I cannot ascertain that they were found at a lower level than the Roman remains, nor have any flint implements, to my knowledge, been found in the place. With them were...
Seite 355 - The foregoing particulars will explain the nature of crannoges ; and the following historic notices, together with the authorities from whence derived, may serve to give an additional interest to the subject, and also to fix the dates of their occupation : — As the earliest discovered and examined crannoge in modern times has been that of Lagore, near Dunshaughlin, county of Meath, so, upon looking into the authorities, we find it the first alluded to. Loch Gabhair is said to have been one of the...

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