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but small use of the old man's privilege, that of giving advice to younger friends. Treat your wife always with respect; it will procure respect to you, not only from her, but from all that observe it. Never use a Nighting expression to her, even in jeft; for flights in jest, after frequent bandyings, are apt to end in angry earnest. Be studious in your profession, and you will be learned. Be industrious · and frugal, and you will be rich. Be sober and temperate, and you will be healthy. Be in general virtuous, and you will be happy. At least, you will, by such conduct, stand the best chance for such consequences. I pray God to bless you both! being ever your affectionate friend,

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ON THE DEATH OF HIS BROTHER,

Mr. JOHN FRANKLIN.

TO MISS HUBBARD.

I CONDOLE with you. We have loft a most dear and valuable relation. But it is the will of God and nature, that thefe mortal bodies be laid afide, when the soul is to enter into real life. This is rather an embryo state, a preparation for living. A man is not completely born until he be dead. Why then should we grieve that a new child is born among the immortals, a new meniber added to their happy society? We are spirits. That bodies should be lent us, while they can afford us pleafure, aslift us in acquiring knowledge,

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or doing good to our fellow-creatures, is a kind and benevolent act of God. When they become unfit for these purposes, and afford us pain instead of pleasure, instead of an aid become an incumbrance, and answer none of the intentions, for which they were given, it is equally kind and benevolent that a way is provided by which we may get rid of them. Death is that way. We ourselves, in some cases, prudently choose a partial death. A mangled painful limb, which cannot be restored, we willingly cut off. He who plucks out a tooth, parts with it freely, since the pain goes with it: and he who quits the whole body, parts at once with all pains, and possibilities of pains and diseases, it was liable to, or capable of making him suffer.

Our friend and we were invited abroad on a party of pleasure, which is

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to last for ever. His chair was ready first; and he is gone before us. We could not all conveniently start together: and why should you and I be grieved at this, since we are soon to follow, and know where to find him?

Adieu.

B. FRANKLIN

TO THE LATE

DOCTOR MATHER OF BOSTON.

REV, SIR,

I RECEIVED your kind letrer, with your excellent advice to the people of the United States, which I read with great pleasure, and hope it will be duly regarded. Such writings, though they may be lightly passed over by many readers, yet, if they make a deep im, pression on one active mind in a hundred, the effects may be considerable.

Permit me to mention one little instanice, which, though it relates to myself, will not be quite uninteresting to you. When I was a boy, I met with a book entitled " Essays to do good," which I think was written by your father. Io had been so little regarded by a former

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